March 05, 2021
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BDR Mutiny: Unheard Voices

Day 2: Updates. Reuters has a Q&A

Unheard Voices provides a regularly updated status of the BDR mutiny and offers many links to stories, first hand accounts, photos [warning: some of them very graphic] and discussion on whether or not Hasina's government should have agreed to the demands of the BDR mutineers. Elsewhere, in Daily Star, Iffat Nawaz tells us how he started smoking:

I come home from the bazaar call up my relatives in the US and unexpectedly break down. I cry my heart out, I feel lonely again, unsafe, insecure. I think of why I came here, my work, how much it means to me, I tell myself I am exaggerating because I have never been in a situation like this, but I still can't calm myself down.

So I walk out to the bazaar and with bunch of cha walas keep watching the news. They make space for me. They tell me: "Apa bari jaan, bari giya TV dekhen, apnara to borolok, ey khane thaiken na."

Yet somehow they help me fit in. And then a tire bursts on the street and everyone scatters and runs for their lives and a few seconds later realizing what happened breaks into contagious laughter.

And I join them too, in laughing. I say my good byes after watching Munni Shaha's report on television. On my way home I stop by the cigarette stand and buy my first pack of cigarettes. And February 25, 2009 becomes the first day I officially started smoking and melted into being a part of Dhaka like I never thought I could be.

More Here

BDR Mutiny: Unheard Voices
outlookindia.com
1970-01-01T05:30:00+0530

Day 2: Updates. Reuters has a Q&A

Unheard Voices provides a regularly updated status of the BDR mutiny and offers many links to stories, first hand accounts, photos [warning: some of them very graphic] and discussion on whether or not Hasina's government should have agreed to the demands of the BDR mutineers. Elsewhere, in Daily Star, Iffat Nawaz tells us how he started smoking:

I come home from the bazaar call up my relatives in the US and unexpectedly break down. I cry my heart out, I feel lonely again, unsafe, insecure. I think of why I came here, my work, how much it means to me, I tell myself I am exaggerating because I have never been in a situation like this, but I still can't calm myself down.

So I walk out to the bazaar and with bunch of cha walas keep watching the news. They make space for me. They tell me: "Apa bari jaan, bari giya TV dekhen, apnara to borolok, ey khane thaiken na."

Yet somehow they help me fit in. And then a tire bursts on the street and everyone scatters and runs for their lives and a few seconds later realizing what happened breaks into contagious laughter.

And I join them too, in laughing. I say my good byes after watching Munni Shaha's report on television. On my way home I stop by the cigarette stand and buy my first pack of cigarettes. And February 25, 2009 becomes the first day I officially started smoking and melted into being a part of Dhaka like I never thought I could be.

More Here

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