September 19, 2020
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The Youngest Headmaster In The World


Photo Courtesy BBC

As part of its Hunger to Learn series, BBC has this amazing story of a teenager, Babar Ali, whose remarkable education project is transforming the lives of hundreds of poor children. He tresk to school in the morning and then teaches what he has learnt in school to others in the afternoon. He is 16, and since the age of 9 has been running his own, unofficial school giving lessons just the way he has heard them from his teachers in the morning:

Now his afternoon school has 800 students, all from poor families, all taught for free. Most of the girls come here after working, like Chumki, as domestic helps in the village, and the boys after they have finished their day's work labouring in the fields.

"In the beginning I was just play-acting, teaching my friends," Babar Ali says, "but then I realised these children will never learn to read and write if they don't have proper lessons. It's my duty to educate them, to help our country build a better future."

Including Babar Ali there are now 10 teachers at the school, all, like him are students at school or college, who give their time voluntarily. Babar Ali doesn't charge for anything, even books and food are given free, funded by donations. It means even the poorest can come here.

Read the full story at BBC

The Youngest Headmaster In The World
outlookindia.com
1970-01-01T05:30:00+0530


Photo Courtesy BBC

As part of its Hunger to Learn series, BBC has this amazing story of a teenager, Babar Ali, whose remarkable education project is transforming the lives of hundreds of poor children. He tresk to school in the morning and then teaches what he has learnt in school to others in the afternoon. He is 16, and since the age of 9 has been running his own, unofficial school giving lessons just the way he has heard them from his teachers in the morning:

Now his afternoon school has 800 students, all from poor families, all taught for free. Most of the girls come here after working, like Chumki, as domestic helps in the village, and the boys after they have finished their day's work labouring in the fields.

"In the beginning I was just play-acting, teaching my friends," Babar Ali says, "but then I realised these children will never learn to read and write if they don't have proper lessons. It's my duty to educate them, to help our country build a better future."

Including Babar Ali there are now 10 teachers at the school, all, like him are students at school or college, who give their time voluntarily. Babar Ali doesn't charge for anything, even books and food are given free, funded by donations. It means even the poorest can come here.

Read the full story at BBC

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