Friday, Jan 28, 2022
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Adoption

Complex Laws, Bureaucratic Tangles Make Adoption A Long, Painful Journey For Indians

Covid-19 pandemic compounds woes as disruptions lead to further delay in the entire process of adopting a child. But beautiful stories of love and compassion still abound.

Complex Laws, Bureaucratic Tangles Make Adoption A Long, Painful Journey For Indians
Illustration by Saahil
The Hand That Rocks The Cradle, This illustration by Saahil is an alternate take on former Tamil Nadu chief minister J. Jayalalitha’s ‘Cradle Baby Scheme’ under which anyone could anonymously give their newborns babies to the State. The State took care of the babies and even had the right to give them up for adoptions. The scheme was aimed at lowering the number of female foeticide and gender-based abortion.
Complex Laws, Bureaucratic Tangles Make Adoption A Long, Painful Journey For Indians
outlookindia.com
2021-11-23T12:01:06+05:30

When educationist Geet Oberoi decided to adopt her first child, Indya, 14 years ago, procedural delays were the first stumbling block. She was single and had to wait for three years before she could adopt a child. In 2010, Priya Ramanathan, also single, ran into the same wall. She wanted to adopt a seven-month-old baby, but was told that it would take more than two years as single parents were not the preferred choice. Many agencies wouldn’t even accept applications from them. She was lucky, though—the child had health issues and was therefore not preferred by others looking to adopt. In Calcutta, Nibedita Sen, who was looking after the two daughters of her househelp, reached out to Childline for formally adopting the kids. She had not imagined what this could lead to. She and the biological mother were taken to court, which decided to take custody of the children until they turned adults. The kids thus ended up being separated from both the mothers.

“I was 31 when I applied for adoption. At that time, even some judges were opposed to the idea of a single woman becoming an adoptive parent,” says Oberoi. Adopting her second daughter, Maya, turned out to be less arduous, adds Oberoi, who feels there is an urgent need to streamline the process. “There is no proper system in place to ­ensure a secure future for orphaned children. It takes at least three years to clear a child for adoption, but, by that time, the children are older and there would be no takers. Instead of strict rules, there should be child protection services to follow up on adopted kids,” she says.

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