photos

Hafiz Muhammad Saeed

JuD chief Hafiz Saeed being produced at a court in Lahore.

PTI Photo

JuD chief Hafiz Saeed being produced in ATC Lahore.

PTI Photo

Hafiz Saeed, chief of Pakistani religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa, addresses a rally for Kashmir Day in Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistan's prime minister and president offered support for rebels in the Indian part of the disputed Himalayan territory of Kashmir as the country staged rallies marking the annual Day of Solidarity with Kashmir.

AP/PTI Photo

Hafiz Saeed of the JuD arrives at an election rally

Photograph by PTI

Pakistani cleric Hafiz Saeed, the founder of the outlawed Lashkar-e-Taiba group, which was blamed for the 2008 Mumbai attacks that killed 166 people, addresses at a mosque in Lahore, Pakistan. Saeed, a radical cleric wanted by the United States, urged followers to hold rallies across Pakistan to condemn the Supreme Court decision that acquitted Asia Bibi, a Christian woman, who spent eight years on death row accused of blasphemy.

AP/PTI

Hafiz Saeed, center, head of the Pakistani religious party Jamaat-ud-Dawa, affixes his thumb impression before casting a vote in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo

Supporters of Hafiz Saeed, center, head of the Pakistani religious party Jamaat-ud-Dawa, make way for him while he arrives to address an election campaign rally of a newly formed political party Allah-o-Akbar Tehreek, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan will hold general election on July 25.

AP/ PTI

“Every Pakistani condemned 26/11. If you hang Hafiz Saeed without trial and due process of law, he will become a martyr.”

Hafiz Saeed, center, head of the Pakistani religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa inaugurates an election office of the newly formed political party Allah-o-Akbar Tehreek, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Pakistani cleric and head of the Jamaat-ud-Dawa charity, Hafiz Saeed addresses a news conference in Lahore, Pakistan. The radical Pakistani cleric wanted by the United States and released from detention last year claims he is not involved in any illegal activities and is inviting the United Nations to visit the offices of his charity in Lahore. Saeed founded Lashker-e-Taiba, which was blamed for the 2008 Mumbai attacks that killed 166 people.

AP/PTI

Palestinian Ambassador to Pakistan Walid Abu Ali, second left, raises jointly hands with Hafiz Saeed, second right, the head of the hard-line Jamaat-ud-Dawa, and others during an anti-U.S. rally in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The Palestinians have withdrawn their envoy to Pakistan, Ali, after he appeared at a rally with a radical cleric linked to the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

AP/PTI

Pakistani cleric and head of Jamatud Dawa Hafiz Saeed addresses an anti American rally in Lahore, Pakistan. Hundreds of Islamists and other organizations have rallied in major cities of Pakistan, condemning U.S. President Donald Trump for declaring Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

AP/ PTI photo

Hafiz Saeed, head of the Pakistani religious party, Jamaat-ud-Dawa, waves outside a court in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Saeed, head of the Pakistani religious party, Jamaat-ud-Dawa, gives Friday sermon at a mosque in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Saeed, head of the Pakistani religious party, Jamaat-ud-Dawa, waves on his arrival to a court in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Pakistan has decided to put terrorist Hafiz Saeed under house arrest

Hafiz Saeed, leader of thePakistani religious group and charity, Jamaat-ud-Dawa addresses his supporters outside the party's headquarters, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

A Pakistani police officer escorts Hafiz Saeed, left, Chief of Pakistan's religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa outside party's headquarters in Lahore, Pakistan. Hafiz Saeed, whose Jamaat-ud-Dawa is a front for Lashkar-e-Taiba, the group behind the 2008 Mumbai attacks, was placed under house arrest along with four aides.

AP/PTI Photo

An effigy of Hafiz Saeed is fixed at Gopcha Society for burning on the last day of the year 2016 as part of a tradition, in Mumbai.

PTI Photo

Hafiz Saeed, center, leader of the Jamaat-ud-Dawa looks at relief goods his party workers collected for Pakistani Kashmiris who are displaced due to firing at the Line of Control between Pakistan and India.

AP/PTI Photo

Leaders of the Pakistan Defense Council, an alliance of hardline Islamist religious leaders and politicians, from left to right, Hafiz Saeed, Maulana Sami-ul-Haq, and Liaqat Baloch, pray for the victims of violence in Kashmir and suicide bombings during a meeting in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Hafiz Saeed, center, leader of Jamaat-ud-Dawa arrives to address an anti-Indian rally in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Hafiz Saeed, center, head of a religous group Jamaat-ud-Dawa waves to supporters while he with other leaders leads a rally to mark Pakistan Independence Day in Karachi.

AP/PTI

Pakistani religious leaders, from right Hafiz Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawa joins hands with Sirajul Haq, center, and the leader of Hizbul Mujahideen Syed Salahuddin, left, during an anti-Indian rally in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Hafiz Saeed, center, leader of Jamaat-ud-Dawa join hands with other leaders to express solidarity with Indian Kashmiris at a rally in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

Hafiz Saeed, chief of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-ud-Dawa, addresses a rally to mark Kashmir Day, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Saeed, center, head of religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa leaves after addressing a rally against caricatures published in French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in Lahore, Pakistan. Thousands of supporters of hard-line Jamaat-ud-Dawa rallied in eastern city of Lahore against the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and its publication of cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad.

AP/PTI

Muslims groups protest against Hafiz Muhammad Saeed over his 'derogatory' remarks against India, at Albert Ekka Chowk in Ranchi.

PTI Photo

BJP workers burn pictures of Hafiz Saeed during a protest in Bikaner.

PTI Photo

Ved Pratap Vaidik with Hafiz Saeed

Journalist Ved Pratap Vaidik with LeT founder and chief Hafiz Saeed.

Courtesy - @DrVaidik on Twitter

Hafiz Saeed, head of Pakistani religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa, raises a fist during an anti-U.S. rally in Lahore, Pakistan. Jamaat-ud Dawa organised countrywide protest against the U.S. for declaring two of their party leaders as "global terrorists."

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Saeed, right, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah speaks with Maulana Ahmed Ludhianvi, chief of a hard-line Sunni Muslim group Ahle Sunnat Waljamaat, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Leaders said that they will observe "Kashmir Day" on Feb. 5 to support Indian Kashmiris struggling for independence.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

Hafiz Saeed, left, head of Pakistani religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa talks to anti-U. S. cleric Samiul Haq during a jirga or grand meeting, in Peshawar, Pakistan. Participants of the meeting condemn the ongoing U.S. drone strikes targeting militants hiding in Pakistani tribal areas. Due to strikes protesters blocked a road in northwest Pakistan used to truck NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan, the latest sign of rising tension caused by the attacks.

AP/PTI Photo

Hafiz Saeed, center, head of Pakistani religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa addresses an anti-American rally in Lahore. A suspected U.S. drone strike killed an alleged militant in Pakistan's northwest tribal region, intelligence officials said Friday, the latest indication Washington has no intention of throttling back its unmanned aircraft attacks despite increasing tension with Pakistan over the attacks.

AP/PTI

A Pakistani boy holds a banner standing next to Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawwa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba militant group, while heading a protest to condemn U.S. drone attacks in Pakistan, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawwa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba militant group, arrives for prayers of Eid al-Adha, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, fourth from right, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah, joins other leaders during a rally in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, front right, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, leads the Eid al-Fitr prayers in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo

People shake hands with Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, center right, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, after the Eid al-Fitr prayers in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo

TV Grab: Hafiz Saeed, mastermind of the 26/11 terror attacks in Mumbai, led Eid prayers at the famous Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore, Pakistan.

TV Grab/ NDTV

Pushed to unity Yasin Malik sharing platform with Hafiz Saeed in Islamabad

AP

Shiv Sena activists shout slogans against Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front leader Yasin Malik, seen in photo at right, during a protest in Jammu. The protestors wanted the government to act against Malik, who had on Sunday along with Pakistan's religious group, Jamat-ud-Dawa, chief Hafiz Saeed, attended a hunger strike in Islamabad to protest against the hanging of Kashmiri man Mohammed Afzal Guru. Guru was hanged in New Delhi early Saturday following his conviction in a deadly attack on India's Parliament.

AP Photo/ Channi Anand

LeT’s Hafiz Saeed at a Quetta rally. He has demanded action against saffron terror.

AFP (From Outlook 04 February 2013)

Hafiz Saeed, center, head of a Pakistani religious party Jammat-Ud-Dawa listens to his aid as he attends anti NATO rally in Islamabad. Thousands of Islamists rallied in the Pakistan's capital to protest against the government's decision to allow the U.S. and other NATO countries to resume shipping troop supplies through the country to Afghanistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, center, is surrounded by guards as he arrives to attend a rally condemning the movement of NATO supplies to Afghanistan through Pakistan, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Maulana Samiul Haq, right, head of a coalition of hardline Islamist religious leaders and politicians 'Defense of Pakistan Council', speaks as a coalition leader Hafiz Mohammad Saeed looks on during a press conference in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The Defense of Pakistan Council announced to launch a protest campaign against the reopening the NATO supply route, Haq said.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Hafiz Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, center, surrounded by guards, attends with his supporters a rally against a possible resumption of NATO supplies to neighboring Afghanistan, in Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistan's parliament has unanimously approved new guidelines for the country in its troubled relationship with the United States, a decision that could pave the way for the reopening of supply lines to NATO troops in neighboring Afghanistan.

AP/PTI

Hafiz Saeed (L) chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, addresses a rally with Abdur Rehman Makki, center and Amir Hamza to protest against the Pakistan government's decision to accord Most Favored Nation status to India, in Lahore, Pakistan. The MFN status will help both countries to break trade barriers.

AP Photo/ K.M.Chaudary

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, center, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawwa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba arrives to an anti U.S. and anti India rally organised by Pakistan Defense Council in Peshawar, Pakistan. The United States has offered a $10 million bounty for Hafiz who allegedly orchestrated the 2008 Mumbai attacks and has been directing an anti-American political movement in recent months.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Protests against the bounty for Saeed

AP

Open air occasion Hafiz Saeed arrives for his press conference in Rawalpindi on April 4

AFP (From Outlook, April 23, 2012)

Supporters of a Pakistan students group 'Muttahidah Talba Mahaz' hold a rally in Karachi, Pakistan. Protesters condemned the United States for putting US$10 million bounty on Hafiz Saeed, founder of the Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba.

AP Photo

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawwah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, addresses a news conference with anti-American cleric Sami ul Haq in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Saeed, one of Pakistan's most notorious extremists mocked the United States during a defiant media conference close to the country's military headquarters, a day after the U.S. slapped a $10 million bounty on him.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba talks in Islamabad, Pakistan. The US has offered a $10 million bounty for a Pakistani militant leader who allegedly orchestrated the 2008 Mumbai attacks and has been directing an anti-American political movement in recent months.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba in Islamabad, Pakistan. The United States has offered a $10 million bounty for a Pakistani militant leader who allegedly orchestrated the 2008 Mumbai attacks and has been directing an anti-American political movement in recent months.

AP Photo/ B.K. Bangash

File photo of Pakistan-based Jamaat-ud-Dawa chief Hafiz Saeed, the mastermind of the 26/11 Mumbai attacks. The US has announced a USD 10 million bounty on Hafiz Saeed, a move welcomed by India, which said it sends a strong signal to LeT and its "patrons" that the international community remains united in combating terrorism.

Chief of Pakistani religious group Jamat-ud-Dawa Hafiz Saeed, second from right, shows solidarity with others at a rally against the United States in Lahore, Pakistan. A provocative resolution by an American congressman calling for the secession of Pakistan's largest province which is rich in gas and oil has caused an uproar in Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M.Chaudary

Hafiz Saeed Ahmed, second from left, leader of the banned Islamic group joins hands with other party leaders during a rally in Lahore, Pakistan. Thousands of supporter of various groups rallied in Lahore against the NATO airstrikes that killed 24 Pakistan army soldiers.

AP Photo/ Hamza Ahmed

Hafiz Saeed, center, the leader of religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa, and wanted by Indian government on different counts, joins hands with other leaders at a rally to condemn the United States for the killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, Sunday, May 15, 2011 in Lahore, Pakistan. Saeed called bin Laden a martyr and demanded the Pakistani government break ties with the United States.

AP/PTI

In Mourning Hafiz Saeed addresses crowds

AFP (From Outlook, May 23, 2011)

Sandeep Adhwaryu

Hafiz Saeed, leader of the banned Islamic group Jamat-ud-Dawa flanked by party workers leaves premises in Islamabad, Pakistan. Hafiz Saeed is reported to have said that it is very sad that America is negotiating with the Taliban whom it has been beating for the last ten years but on the other hand the US continues drone attacks in Pakistan. This is its double standard and is only to serve its own purposes.

AP Photo/B.K.Banagash

Hafiz Saeed, front center, leader of a banned Islamic group Jamat-ud-Dawa leads prayers for Kashmiri leader Moulvi Showkat Ahmed Shah, who was killed in a blast in Srinagar, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Saeed rejected any moves to start peace talks with India.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Hafiz Saeed, right, leader of the banned Islamic group Jamat-ud-Dawa speaks during prayers for Kashmiri leader Moulvi Showkat Ahmed Shah, who was killed in a blast in Srinagar, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Saeed rejected any moves to start peace talks with India.

AP Photo/Anjum Naveed

Illustration By Sandeep Adhwaryu

Pakistani "religious" leaders sit on the Israel, U.S. and Indian flags placed by supporters of Pakistan's banned religious party Jamat-ud-Dawa during an anti Israeli and its allies rally in Lahore, Pakistan on Sunday, June 13, 2010. Apart from Hafiz Saeed, Syed Munawar Hasan, the Amir of Jamaat-i-Islami, Senator Sajid Mir of Jamiat Ahl-i-Hadith, Hafiz Husain Ahmed of Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam and Hamid Gul, a former chief of the Inter-Services Intelligence, were also present.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Saeed, blamed by India for masterminding 26/11, head of Pakistan's Jamat-ud-Dawa, and the founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, addresses during an anti Israel-and-allies rally in Lahore, Pakistan on Sunday, June 13, 2010. Syed Munawar Hasan, the Amir of Jamaat-i-Islami, Senator Sajid Mir of Jamiat Ahl-i-Hadith, Hafiz Husain Ahmed of Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam and Hameed Gul, a former chief of the Inter-Services Intelligence, were also present. Among other things, Saeed said: “Pakistan is under siege and attempts are being made with the connivance of Israel to convert it into a barren land by constructing dams on its rivers.”

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Saeed, blamed by India for masterminding 26/11, center with glasses, head of Pakistan's Jamat-ud-Dawa, and the founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba addresses during an anti Israeli rally in Lahore, Pakistan on Sunday, June 13, 2010. Syed Munawar Hasan, the Amir of Jamaat-i-Islami, Senator Sajid Mir of Jamiat Ahl-i-Hadith, Hafiz Husain Ahmed of Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam and Hameed Gul, a former chief of the Inter-Services Intelligence, were also present. Among other things, Saeed said: “Pakistan is under siege and attempts are being made with the connivance of Israel to convert it into a barren land by constructing dams on its rivers.”

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

In this Feb. 5, 2010 file photo, Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, the leader of the banned Islamic group Jamaat-ud-Dawa is seen during an anti-Indian rally in Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistan's Supreme Court ruled today that the government cannot detain the hardline cleric suspected to have masterminded the deadly 2008 siege of Mumbai.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary, File

LeT founder Hafiz Saeed at an anti-India rally in Lahore in March

AP

Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, the leader of a banned Islamic group Jamaat-ud-Dawa addresses anti-Indian rally, in Lahore, Pakistan. Saeed, mastermind of the Mumbai attacks, today alleged that India has "imposed war on Pakistan" by constructing "illegal dams" and diverting water of Pakistani rivers and said the government must prepare the nation to counter this aggression.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

LeT leader Hafiz Saeed at the Kashmir Solidarity Day rally in Lahore on Feb 5, 2010

AP (From Outlook, Feb 14)

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah accused of masterminding the Mumbai terrorist attacks last year, was placed under house arrest for inciting people to wage jehad.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary, File

A Pakistani police officer stands guard behind a barricaded street leading to the house of Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, in Lahore, Pakistan. Saeed, the head of a banned Islamist group and mastermind of the Mumbai terror attacks that killed more than 160 people, has been once again put under house arrest.

AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary

Prof Hafiz Mohammed Saeed - Jamaat-ud Daawa
He’s one man India would love to get its hands on—and a prime example of jehadis flourishing under state patronage. Hafeez is the amir of the pro-Kashmiri Jamaat-ud-Daawa, which is believed to be a front for the Lashkar-e-Toiba, the terror outfit he founded. Thirty-six members of his extended family died while migrating to Pakistan from India during Partition. In founding the LeT, he, a resident of Punjab, broke the tradition of Pashtuns leading the jehad against India. The Lashkar has few Pashtuns and even fewer Kashmiris. Wanted in India for 26/11, he’s accused of masterminding several terror operations in Kashmir and the 2002 suicide assault on the Red Fort in New Delhi. Never found to have been involved in a terror incident in Pakistan, Saeed was placed under house arrest post-Mumbai, but was soon released following court orders. Experts feel the Lashkar’s focus has shifted beyond India to assume the role of “Islam’s saviour”. Pakistani authorities say they will move against Saeed only if they get hard evidence against him.

Supporters of Hafiz Mohammed Saeed, chief Jamaat-ud-Dawah, celebrate the Lahore High Court's decision to release the hard-line Islamist cleric, in Lahore, Pakistan. The Pakistani court ordered the release of Saeed, who was allegedly linked to the attacks in the Indian city of Mumbai, his lawyer said, setting the stage for a new round of tensions between the two countries.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Hafiz Mohammed Saeed, chief of an Islamic charity Jamaat-ud-Dawa, leaves under tight security after appearing before the judicial review board of High Court in Lahore, Pakistan. Saeed was detained under house arrest last year as part of Pakistan's investigation into the Mumbai attacks.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

A Pakistani police officer shows the way for Lashkar-e-Taiba founder Hafiz Mohammed Saeed after his detention in Lahore. Saeed was detained for a two-month period once again by the authorities after being released for a brief period of one hour following a Lahore High Court order to set him free. The court had held that the government has failed to provide strong reasons for his arrest and his detention was based on speculation that he could disturb peace. Saeed, who currently heads a NGO called Jamat-ud-Dawa, (JuD) was arrested on August 10 under the maintenance of public order on the ground that he was likely to disturb peace during his planned rally coinciding with Pakistan's Independence Day on August 14.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudhry