photos

Kim Jong il

This image made from video of a news bulletin aired by North Korea's KRT, shows what was said to be North Korea leader Kim Jung Un, center, applauding after the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile, ICBM, in North Korea's northwest.

AP/PTI

North Koreans are dwarfed against giant portraits of the late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il as they walk past an apartment building, in Wonsan, North Korea.

Crowds bow to statues of North Korea's late leader Kim Jong Il, right, and his father, North Korea's founder Kim Il Sung, which tower over the capital Pyongyang on a hill, North Korea.

AP/PTI

North Koreans bow beneath portraits of the late leaders Kim Jong Il and Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang. Across the capital city, North Koreans observed the second anniversary of the death of Kim Jong Il.

AP Photo/ David Guttenfelder

Kim II Sung, North Korea Annie Kevans 2004 Oil on paper 51 x 41 cm © All rights reserved - The Saatchi Gallery - London Contemporary Art Gallery

Annie Kevans/ © All rights reserved - The Saatchi Gallery - London Contemporary Art Gallery

South Korean protesters burn effigies of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, and late leaders Kim Jong Il and Kim Il Sung at an anti-North Korea protest on the birthday of Kim Il Sung in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea's defense minister, Kim Kwan-jin, told a parliamentary committee in Seoul that North Korea remains ready to launch a missile from its east coast, though he declined to disclose how he got the information.

AP Photo/ Kin Cheung

A North Korean portrait photographer instructs North Korean soldiers to pose for a picture under a mosaic of the late leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il at an exhibition in Pyongyang where Kimjongilia flowers, named after Kim Jong Il, were on display.

AP Photo/David Guttenfelder

North Korean soldiers, students and civilians surrounded giant portraits of late leaders Kim Il Sung, left, and Kim Jong Il at Kim Il Sung Square in central Pyongyang, North Korea, for a rally denouncing South Korean President Lee Myung-bak. North Koreans said Lee's radio comments about North Korea last week "hurt the dignity" of the North Korean people.

AP Photo/ Vincent Yu

North Korean dancers perform in front of portraits of the late leaders, Kim Il Sung, left, and his son Kim Jong Il, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, to celebrate 100 years since the birth of the North Korean founder Kim Il Sung.

AP Photo/ Vincent Yu

Mosaics of the two late North Korean leaders Kim Jong Il, right, and Kim Il Sung stand during an unveiling ceremony as part of celebrations marking the 100 year anniversary of Kim Il Sung's birth, in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ Kim Kwang Hyon

Soldiers and residents arrive to lay flowers at a portrait of late leader Kim Jong Il outside Pyongyang Indoor Stadium to mark the end of the 100-day mourning period, in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea urged its people to rally behind new leader Kim Jong Un as tens of thousands gathered to observe the end of a 100-day mourning period following the death of his father, Kim Jong Il.

AP Photo/Kim Kwang Hyon

And now Time is reporting yet another photoshopped controversy out of North Korea. The photo on top is from Kim Jong Il’s funeral procession distributed by AP on December 28 and the one at the bottom is from the same news agency distributed by Reuters, Agence France-Presse and the European Pressphoto Agency, from KCNA, North Korea’s state news agency, later in the day. If you see carefully, as the Time notes, "in the KCNA version, a camera crew and their power cords on the left side of the frame, as well as a couple of stragglers near them, were removed, a patch of blurry snow in their place. Snow was also cloned to cover two other spots in the photograph." The Time goes on to add: "The big question is why did the North Koreans alter the image? Aesthetically, the doctored photograph is tad bit cleaner, lines straightened, but hardly improved. Psychologically speaking though, the clone job adds order to an already tidy scene. In the undoctored version, the people on the left are drifting from the crowd, their attention elsewhere. The snow is less white. Both of those problems were easily solved by Photoshop. I’ve been examining photographs released by the KCNA for years and many are strikingly beautiful—enormous, perfectly-positioned crowds, immaculate and intricately composed. Now we may know why."

AP

In this photo released by the Korean Central News Agency and distributed in Tokyo by the Korea News Service, thousands take part in a national memorial service for late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, in Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea declared Kim Jong Il's son and successor "supreme leader" of the ruling party, military and the people during a memorial for his father in the government's first public endorsement of Kim Jong Un's leadership.

AP Photo/Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service

A TV Grab shows North Korea's next leader Kim Jong Un during a memorial service for late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ KRT via APTN

In this photo released by the Korean Central News Agency and distributed in Tokyo, by the Korea News Service, mourners surround the hearse carrying the coffin of the late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il during his funeral procession through the streets of Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service

North Korea's next leader, Kim Jong Un, front left, salutes beside the hearse carrying the body of his late father and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il during the funeral procession in Pyongyang, North Korea. Behind Kim Jong Un is Jang Song Thaek, Kim Jong Il's brother-in-law and vice chairman of the National Defense Commission.

AP/PTI

A TV Grab shows a huge portrait of late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il is carried during his funeral procession in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ KRT via APTN

TV Grab shows mourners cry during a funeral for the late leader Kim Jong Il, in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ KRT via APTN

A TV Grab shows Kim Jong Il's youngest son and successor, salutes during the funeral for his father at the end of procession outside Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ KRT via APTN

A TV Grab shows mourners cry during a funeral procession for late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in snowy Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ KRT via APTN

Lee Hee-ho, wearing glasses, widow of late former South Korean President Kim Dae-jung, and Hyundai Group chairwoman Hyun Jeong-eun, right, prepare to depart from the Inter-Korean Transit Terminal en route to North Korea from the border village of Paju in the demilitarized zone (DMZ), South Korea. Lee and Hyun are part of a 18 people group allowed by South Korea to attend the funeral of late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/Wally Santana

Anti-North Korean supporters rally to denounce the North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in his death and his son and predecessor Kim Jong Un in front of the Government Complex in Seoul, South Korea. North Korean state television announced, from the capital Pyongyang that the North Korean leader Kim Jong Il had died.

AP Photo/Wally Santana

With Kim Jong Il's death at 69, he may no longer be Looking at Things (having left the task to his son) but at least he can still live on in meme infamy thanks to a new Tumblr, Kim Jong-il Dropping the Bass  -- which is full of is full of pictures of well-known artists and DJs with the late Dear Leader Photoshopped in to look like he’s playing with them.

http://kimjongildroppingthebass.tumblr.com/

You may have views on the powers or propaganda and whether or not the over-the-top public mourning for Kim Jong Il was fake and phoney. But now there's a, well, "100% Genuine Reactions to Kim Jong IL's Death" tumblr page where faces of faux-weeping jokesters are Photoshopped over the photos of “genuine reactions”, implying that the North Koreans are shedding crocodile tears.

@a___k genuinereactions.tumblr.com

In this Oct. 10, 2010 file photo Kim Jong Un, right, along with his father and North Korea leader Kim Jong Il, left, attends a massive military parade marking the 65th anniversary of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea's preparations to transfer power to a third generation of the Kim family, following the recent death of Kim Jong Il, is by no means an anomaly:

AP/PTI

North Korean military personnel weep as they pay their respect to late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il at Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP/PTI

Kim Jong-il, 69-70, North Korean Supreme Leader

North Korean cry as they pay respects to their late leader Kim Jong Il at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service

Voluntary medical workers support a woman who fainted while visiting a portrait of late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo

Mourners grieve as they pay respects in front of a portrait of late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, at the Grand People's Study House in Kim Il Sung Square, in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ APTN

A man helps to her feet a woman who collapsed in grief as mourners gather to lay flowers in mourning for the late North Korean President Kim Jong Il at the main square in central Pyongyang.

AP Photo/ APTN

A video grab shows mourners gather to lay flowers in mourning for the late North Korean President Kim Jong Il, whose portrait hangs above, at the main square in central Pyongyang. North Korea has tightened security in cities, put troops on alert and won loyalty pledges from top generals after leader Kim Jong Il's death as it consolidates power behind his anointed heir.

AP Photo/ APTN

Retired South Korean Marines toss posters of Kim Jong Il in the air in a sign of disrespect during a protest a day after his death was announced in front of the Government Complex in Seoul, South Korea. North Korean state television announced Monday from the capital Pyongyang that the North Korean leader Kim Jong Il had died on Saturday.

Wally Santana/AP Photo

Mourners carry a wreath as they arrive to pay respects to the body of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il at the Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang, North Korea. As the country mourned for a second day with high-level visits to Kim's body at a memorial palace and public gatherings of weeping citizens, state media fed a budding personality cult around his youngest known son and anointed heir, Kim Jong Un, hailing him as a "lighthouse of hope.".

AP Photo

Video grab: Kim Jong Un, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's youngest known son and successor, visits the body of senior Kim with top military and Workers' Party officials in a memorial palace in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ KRT

Video grab: Kim Jong Un, centre, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's youngest known son and successor, visits the body of the senior Kim with top military and Workers' Party officials in a memorial palace in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo

Video grab: Kim Jong Un, centre, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's youngest known son and successor, bows as he visits the body of the senior Kim in a memorial palace in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo

Video grab: Kim Jong Un, centre, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's youngest known son and successor, visits the body of the senior Kim in a memorial palace in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo

Chinese workers bring the condolence wreaths for late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il at North Korean embassy as police officers help to enter in Beijing, China.

AP Photo/ Eugene Hoshiko

Video grab: The body of North Korean leader Kim Jong il is laid in a memorial palace in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP Photo/ KRT

Retired South Korean Marines toss posters of Kim Jong Il in the air in a sign of disrespect during a protest a day after his death was announced in front of the Government Complex in Seoul, South Korea.

AP Photo/ Wally Santana

North Korean women cry after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il in Pyongyang, North Korea.

AP/PTI

North Koreans cry and scream in a display of mourning for their leader Kim Jong Il at the foot of a giant statue of his father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, after Kim Jong Il’s death was announced. North Korea's news agency reported that he had died after having a heart attack on a train, adding that he had been treated for cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases for a long time. He was 69.

AP Photo/APTN

South Koreans watch a news reporting about the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il on TV screens at the Yongsan Electronic shop in Seoul, South Korea. Kim Jong Il's death after 17 years as leader was announced by state television two days after he died. He was 69.

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

In this undated photo from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency, distributed by Korea News Service, Kim Jong Il, left, takes part of a souvenir picture during his childhood with his parents, Kim Jong Suk, right, and leader Kim Il Sung. North Korea's news agency reported that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il had died on after having a heart attack on a train. He was 69.

AP Photo/Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service

North Korean leader Kim Jong-il smooching South Korean president Lee Myung-bak

Benetton

Unidentified former North Korean defectors tear photos of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, his late father Kim Il Sung and his youngest son Kim Jong Un during a rally denouncing North Korea's bombardment on a South Korean border island, in Seoul, South Korea. Two weeks after North Korea shelled a South Korean island, the rivals are still trading threats. Tensions remain at their highest in more than a decade, and though neither side is backing down, all-out war is unlikely.

AP Photo/ Ahn Young-joon

South Korea military veterans burn banners against North Korean leader Kim JongIl and his son Kim Jong Un during a protest denouncing North Korea in Seoul, South Korea. South Korean lawmakers slammed the government over revelations the country's spies failed to take seriously, intelligence that indicated North Korea might attack a front-line island. Four South Koreans were killed when North Korea fired artillery on South Korea's Yeonpyeong Island.

AP Photo/Wally Santana

South Korean veterans beat and burn national flags and effigies of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and his son Kim Jong Un during a protest in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak took responsibility Monday for failing to protect his citizens from a deadly North Korean artillery attack last week, vowing tough consequences for any future aggression and expressing outrage over the "ruthlessness of the North Korean regime."

AP Photo/Wally Santana

A South Korean protester tears a portrait of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, left, his son Kim Jong Un and a North Korean flag with a knife during a rally denouncing North Korea's bombardment on South Korean border island, in front of the Defense Ministry in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea's president vowed on Thursday to boost troops on the island targeted by a North Korean artillery barrage, while the North stridently warned of additional attacks if the South carries out any "reckless military provocations."

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

KIM JONG UN is to be the successor of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il. The Swiss-educated third son, said to be in his 20s, was elected to the ruling party’s No. 2 military post.

An anti-North Korea demonstrator dressed as North Korea leader Kim Jong-il holds a mock missile during a skit in Seoul, South Korea.

AP Photo/Wally Santana

In this photo taken March 1, 2009, a South Korean protester with portraits of Kim Jong Il and his alleged third son Kim Jong Un, bottom, shouts slogans during a rally in Seoul, South Korea. The recent sinking of a South Korean warship may well provide Kim Jong Un with the coup he's seeking to bolster the support of his communist country's powerful military, a million-man force in need of a boost after a November sea battle left one North Korean sailor dead.

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

South Korean war veterans burn an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il during a rally against North Korea in Seoul. North Korea threatened to block all cross-border traffic and blow up any South Korean loudspeakers blasting propaganda northward after a six-year hiatus, as tensions soared over the sinking of a South Korean warship.

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Former soldiers with the South Korean Headquarters of Intelligence Detachment unit tear a North Korean flag during a rally held against North Korea in front of the Defense Ministry in Seoul, South Korea. The sign reads 'Nuclear, Naval warship Cheonan, Kim Jong Il's brutality.'

AP Photo/ Lee Jin-man

Minister of Commerce and Industry Anand Sharma, shakes hands with Shon Kyung-shik, chairman of the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry, as South Korean Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon looks on during Korea-India Business Luncheon Meeting in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea and India signed a broad trade agreement to slash tariffs on goods and services in a bid to increase commerce between two of Asia's biggest economies.

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

This image made from video broadcast shows a still photograph of former US President Bill Clinton, right, standing with the North Korea's leader Kim Jong II in Pyongyang, North Korea. Bill Clinton met with Kim Jong II on the first day of a surprise visit to Pyongyang, holding "exhaustive" talks that covered a wide range of topics, state-run media said.

AP Photo/KRT TV via APTN

South Korean protesters with defaced photos of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il shout slogans during a rally against North Korea's nuclear test near the U.S. embassy in Seoul, South Korea. According to reports, North Korea was likely preparing to fire short range missiles off its western coast, a day after the country defied world powers and carried out an underground test of a nuclear bomb.

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

North Korean government officials, including leader Kim Jong Il, (center) sit beneath a statue of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung during a session of Parliament in Pyongyang. In a report to the North Korean legislature, Premier Hong Song Nam said his country must "readjust its economic foundations" this year and open itself up to more international trade and cooperation.

Korea News Service/ AP

23 Aug 2002: Russian President Vladimir Putin and North Korean leader Kim Jong II smile as Putin's press secretary Alexei Gromov gives a command to stop shooting during their meeting in Vladivostok. Kim Jong II, leader of one of the world's most closed countries, came to what once was one of Russia's most closed cities in a trip focusing on economic reform.

Alexander Zemlianichenko/ AP

Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong II prior to their talks in Pyongyang. Koizumi visited North Korea hoping to tackle deep disagreements that have left the Asian neighbours far apart for decades.

AP

22 October 2002: South Korean war veterans burn an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il during an anti-North Korea rally demanding to stop its nuclear weapons program, at the war veterans' office building in Seoul. More than 1,000 veterans attended the rally.

Yun Jai-hyoung/ AP

FRIDAY, APRIL 25
A Chinese man wearing a mask counts his money near newspapers showing U.S. envoy James Kelly and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in Beijing. U.S. and North Korean delegations met separately with China's foreign minister before holding a brief informal trilateral meeting. The Chinese text reads 'US North Korea Beijing closed door talks.'

AP

28 FebruaryA South Korean protester wearing a North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's portrait, attends an anti-North Korean rally in front of the City Hall in Seoul. After four days of intense negotiations, the six-party talks on the North Korean nuclear weapons issue ended in Beijing without a breakthrough, after envoys failed to thrash out 'severe differences' on the wordings of a planned joint statement but reached a 'consensus' on the setting up of a working group and holding of the next round of talks. Earlier North Korea was offered econmic compensation if it ends its nuclear weapons programme but was turned down by Pyongyang . The US is demanding a 'complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement' of North Korea's nuclear weapons programmes.

AP Photo/ Lee Jin-man

October 9: Oh, Dear Leader Eccentricity, self-defence, brinkmanship—what made Kim Jong-il blow the N-horn?  The reported nuclear test by North Korea sparked off a series of immediate international condemnations as the United States blew hot and cold about United Nations Security Council and Pakistan was quick to try and distance itself, saying there was "absolutely no link" between its disgraced scientist AQ Khan, who had confessed to have sold nuclear technology to the Stalinist regime. As for China and others...thereby hung a tale.

Monday 9 October
South Korean protesters shout slogans as they trample underfoot an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il tied to a dummy of a missile during an anti-North Korea rally in front of the Government House in Seoul, South Korea. The Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea has said it has performed its first-ever nuclear weapons test, claiming it set off a successful underground blast in defiance of international warnings. The North's official Korean Central News Agency said the underground test was performed successfully "with indigenous wisdom and technology 100 percent," and that no radiation leaked from the test site. The reported nuclear test has sparked off a series of immediate international condemnations and the United States have asked the United Nations Security Council to take "immediate actions" to respond to the North Korean nuclear test. Pakistan has also distanced itself from North Korea, saying there was "absolutely no link" between its disgraced scientist AQ Khan, who had confessed to have sold nuclear technology to the Stalinist regime.

AP Photo/ Lee Jin-man

Wednesday 5 July
South Korean protesters burn a cartoon of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and flags during an anti-North Korea rally in Seoul. North Korea test-fired seven missiles including a long-range Taepodong-2 capable of reaching US soil, triggering international outrage and crisis talks at the United Nations Security council. US officials said that the first set of missiles, including five short and medium-range models as well as the Taepodong-2 which failed shortly after launch, splashed down in the Sea of Japan while Japan's Defense Agency has said a seventh missile was fired some 10 hours later and that it was likely a short-range Nodong or Scud. Washington has described the tests as "provocative behaviour" and said it was dispatching a senior official to the region shortly after the firings, which coincided with the US Independence Day holiday and a space shuttle launch.

AP Photo/ Lee Jin-man

South Korean protesters burn a cartoon of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and flags during an anti-North Korea rally in Seoul. North Korea test-fired seven missiles today including a long-range Taepodong-2 capable of reaching US soil, triggering international outrage and crisis talks at the United Nations Security council. US officials said that the first set of missiles, including five short and medium-range models as well as the Taepodong-2 which failed shortly after launch, splashed down in the Sea of Japan while Japan's Defense Agency has said a seventh missile was fired some 10 hours later and that it was likely a short-range Nodong or Scud. Washington has described the tests as "provocative behaviour" and said it was dispatching a senior official to the region shortly after the firings, which coincided with the US Independence Day holiday and a space shuttle launch.

AP Photo/ Lee Jin-man