photos

Salman Taseer

Sumeira Mumtaz, left, wife of Mumtaz Qadri holds son Mohammad Ali at a rally organized by a Pakistani religious party in Islamabad, Pakistan. Dozens of protesters demanded the release of Qadri, who is sentenced to death by a court, for killing Salman Taseer, the governor of Punjab, for alleged blasphemy on this day last year.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

Supporters of Mumtaz Qadri, the confessed killer of a liberal Pakistani governor, chant slogans during a rally outside the Islamabad High Court in Islamabad, Pakistan. A two-member Islamabad High Court bench granted stay to the death sentence on Mumtaz Qadri who assassinated Punjab Gov. Salman Taseer in Islamabad in January.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-i-Islami, rally in support of Mumtaz Qadri, the confessed killer of Punjab governor Salman Taseer, in Karachi, Pakistan. A Pakistani court convicted and sentenced Qadri to death for killing Taseer earlier this year, a murder that led to fears the country was buckling under the weight of extremism.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

A supporter of Mumtaz Qadri, the confessed killer of a liberal Pakistani governor, chants slogans next to burning tires during a rally to condemn the court decision against Qadri, in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. A Pakistani court convicted and sentenced a police officer to death for the killing of a liberal governor earlier this year, a murder that led to fears the country was buckling under the weight of extremism.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Islamists with posters in praise of Qadri, Taseer’s killer

AP

A candle-light vigil for Salman Taseer in Lahore

AFP (From Outlook, January 31, 2011)

Pakistanis stand next to burning tyres holding banners and chanting slogans during a protest in support of Mumtaz Qadri, alleged killer of Punjab governor Salman Taseer, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Salman Taseer was killed on Tuesday by his bodyguard commando reportedly enraged by his opposition to laws decreeing death for insulting Islam.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

People rally for the release of Mumtaz Qadri, who allegedly gunned down Punjab's governor Salman Taseer, holding a banner reading "release Mumtaz Qadri or arrest all of us," in Mansehra, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Aqeel Ahmed

A Pakistani woman scatters flowers at the site of the shooting which killed Salman Taseer governor of Pakistan's Punjab province, in Islamabad. Taseer was killed on January 4, allegedly by his bodyguard commando, reportedly enraged by his opposition to laws decreeing death for insulting Islam.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Supporters of the Pakistan People's party burn tyres and chant slogans during a protest to condemn the killing of Salman Taseer, governor of Punjab, in Peshawar, Pakistan. Taseer was killed by his bodyguard commando reportedly enraged by his opposition to laws decreeing death for insulting Islam.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

PPP activists at Taseer’s funeral

AFP (From Outlook, January 17, 2011)

Cheers for Malik Mumtaz Qadri a day after the killing

AP

Members of Pakistan's Women Action light candles to pay tribute to slain governor of Punjab Salman Taseer in Karachi, Pakistan. Lawyers showered the suspected killer of a prominent Pakistani governor with rose petals when he arrived at court and an influential Muslim scholars group praised the assassination of the outspoken opponent of laws that order death for those who insult Islam. Mumtaz Qadri, 26, made his first appearance in an Islamabad court, where a judge remanded him in custody a day after he allegedly sprayed automatic gunfire at the back of Punjab province Gov. Salman Taseer while he was supposed to be protecting him as a bodyguard.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Malik Mumtaz Hussain Qadri, center, the accused killer of Punjab's Gov. Salman Taseer, arrives at court, in Islamabad, Pakistan. More than 500 Muslim scholars praised the man suspected of killing a Pakistani governor because the politician opposed blasphemy laws that mandate death for those convicted of insulting Islam. The group of scholars and clerics known as Jamaat Ahle Sunnat is affiliated with a moderate school of Islam and represents the mainstream Barelvi sect. The group said in a statement that no one should pray for Taseer or express regret for his murder.

AP/PTI

Commando of Pakistan's Elite force Mumtaz Qadri, right, who allegedly killed Punjab's governor Salman Taseer sits in a police custody in Islamabad, Pakistan. An intelligence official interrogating the suspect, identified as Mumtaz Qadri, told that the bearded elite force police commando was boasting about the assassination, saying he was proud to have killed a blasphemer. The governor of Pakistan's powerful Punjab province was shot dead by one of his guards in the Pakistani capital. The killing was the most high-profile assassination of a political figure in Pakistan since the slaying of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto on December 2007.

AP/PTI

Pakistani police officers collect evidence at the scene where Punjab Governor Salman Taseer was shot dead by one of his guards, in Islamabad, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

A supporter of Pakistan People's party mourns the death of Punjab's governor Salman Taseer who was shot dead by one of his guards, at a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. The governor of Pakistan's powerful Punjab province was assassinated by one of his guards.

AP Photo/B.K.Bangash

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2010 file photo, Salman Taseer, right, Governor of Pakistani Punjab Province, listens to Pakistani Christian woman Asia Bibi, left, at a prison in Sheikhupura near Lahore, Pakistan. Taseer was shot dead by one of his guards in the Pakistani capital, apparently because he had spoken out against the country's controversial blasphemy laws, officials said.

AP Photo/File

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2010 file photo, Salman Taseer, Governor of Pakistani Punjab Province, talks to reporters after meeting with Pakistani Christian woman Asia Bibi, not in photo, at a prison in Sheikhupura near Lahore, Pakistan. Taseer was shot dead, by one of his guards in the Pakistani capital, apparently because he had spoken out against the country's controversial blasphemy laws, officials said.

AP Photo/File

Pakistan Olympic Association President Syed Arif Hassan holds the Commonwealth Games baton as Pakistani Punjab Governor Salman Taseer, right, looks on at the Pakistani side of the Wagah border in Amritsar, Punjab. Hassan handed over the baton later to India's Commonwealth Games organising committee head Suresh Kalmadi.

AP Photo/Ashwini Bhatia