photos

Guatemala

In this photo shot with slow shutter speed, soldiers wearing protective face masks as a precaution against the new coronavirus march to Constitution square for the independence day celebration in Guatemala City. Guatemala and Central America are celebrating 199 years of independence from Spain.

Photo by AP/PTI

A zoo keeper feeds a giraffe during a media tour of La Aurora Zoo, Guatemala City. The zoo reopened to the public after the park had been closed for months as a preventive measure to curb the spread of COVID-19.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Freshly dug graves are seen at a section where COVID-19 victims are buried at La Verbena cemetery in Guatemala City.

AP/PTI Photo

An older man walks through an empty street during lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus in Guatemala City.

AP/PTI Photo

A man wearing a mask against the spread of the new coronavirus emblazoned with a photo of Argentina's soccer star Lionel Messi, poses for a photo at La Terminal market in Guatemala City.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A dog walks in the Chichicastenango artisan and food market empty of shoppers during a stay-at-home curfew across the country to help prevent the spread of the new coronavirus in Santo Tomas Chichicastenango, Guatemala. Activity at the iconic market has been limited to the sale of food and only for a few hours, in an effort to help prevent the spread of the new coronavirus.

Photo by AP/PTI

Travelers wait to take a charter flight coordinated by the U.S. embassy at La Aurora airport in Guatemala City. American citizens stranded abroad because of the coronavirus pandemic are seeking help in returning to the United States.

Photo by AP/PTI

Central American migrants cross the Suchiate River from Tecun Uman, Guatemala, to Mexico. Migrants hoping to reach the United States marooned in Guatemala waded en masse across a river leading to Mexico in an attempt to convince authorities there to allow them passage through the country.

AP/PTI

Migrant youth fight over cigarettes on the Mexican side of the Suchiate River near Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on the border with Guatemala. Some Central American migrants are stranded in a sort of no-man’s land on the river border between Guatemala and Mexico after running up against lines of Mexican National Guard troops the previous day.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Central American migrants cross the Suchiate River by foot from Tecun Uman, Guatemala, to Mexico.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Migrants gather at the bridge spanning the Suchiate River in Tecun Uman, Guatemala at the border with Mexico.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

Migrants sit at the bridge spanning the Suchiate River in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. More than a thousand Central American migrants hoping to reach United States marooned in Guatemala were preparing to again walk en masse across a bridge leading to Mexico in an attempt to convince authorities there to allow them passage through the country.

AP/PTI

Migrants line up behind an Honduran flag at the border crossing between Guatemala and Mexico in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. More than a thousand Central American migrants surged onto a bridge spanning the Suchiate River between that marks the border between both countries as Mexican National Guardsmen attempted to impede their journey north.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Alejandro Giammattei, center, waves to crow accompanied by his doughter Ana Marcela after sworn-in as president of Guatemala at the National Theater in Guatemala City. Guatemala swears in Giammattei, a conservative physician opposed to gay marriage and abortion, as its new president while the country's outgoing leader exits amid swirling corruption accusations.

AP/PTI Photo

Guatemala's President-elect Alejandro Giammattei, left, attends a rehearsal of his swearing-in ceremony at the National Theatre, the day before his inauguration in Guatemala City. Giammattei will be sworn-in as the 51st president of Guatemala on Jan. 14.

AP/PTI Photo

An indigenous spiritual guide dances during a celebration honoring Saint Thomas, the patron saint of Chichicastenango, Guatemala. After eight uninterrupted days of celebration in honor of their patron Saint Thomas, fireworks accompany three bands that play simultaneously at the corners of one of the most emblematic markets in Guatemala.

Photo by AP/PTI

Mariachis perform graveside during Day of the Dead celebrations in Sumpango, Guatemala.

AP Photo/ Oliver de Ros

Guatemalan soldiers fly the national flag at the Constitution square in Guatemala City. Guatemala and Central America are celebrating 198 years of independence from Spain.

AP/PTI

Men burn a paper figure of Ivan Velasquez, the commissioner of the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, celebrating outside the mission's headquarters which on this day ends its 12-year mission, in Guatemala City. CICIG is closing its operation after 12 years. It brought to trial three former presidents and hundreds of businessmen, officials, judges and individuals accused of corruption.

AP/PTI

A hooded agronomy student protests outside the hotel where lawmakers are gathered and expected to vote on a deal that Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales' government signed with Washington that would force Salvadoran and Honduran migrants to request asylum in Guatemala instead of the United States, in Guatemala City. Critics of the deal point out that Guatemala has the same problems that are driving Hondurans and Salvadorans to flee their homes: violence, poverty, joblessness and a prolonged drought that has severely hurt farmers.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

The "Volcan de Fuego," or Volcano of Fire, blows outs a thick cloud of ash, seen from Escuintla, Guatemala on the one-year anniversary of the devastating eruption. Dozens of people were buried alive or burned beyond recognition in June when the volcano expelled smoldering gas, ash and rock, catching residents off guard.

AP/PTI

Relatives of Silveria Hernandez, who died in last year's eruption of the "Volcan de Fuego," or Volcano of Fire, place flowers at the site where she died in San Miguel Los Lotes, Escuintla, Guatemala. Dozens of people were buried alive or burned beyond recognition in June when the volcano expelled smoldering gas, ash and rock, catching residents off guard.

AP/PTI

Packages of cocaine, part of s shipment seized by Guatemalan Police are unloaded at an air force base in Guatemala City. More than two thousand kilos of cocaine were confiscated next to a semi-destroyed plane in Champerico on the Pacific coast, southwest of the city, according to the police bulletin released on Sunday.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Carmen Cumes, left, and Rosalina Tuyuc, of the National Coordination of Guatemalan Widows (CONAVIGUA), sit surrounded by portraits of people who are disappeared as a form of protest outside Congress in Guatemala City. Lawmakers postponed the approval of a controversial bill that could give amnesty to the perpetrators of war crimes dating back to the country's bloody civil war.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Activists perform during a rally to mark International Women's Day in Guatemala City. During the march people remembered 41 girls that died in a fire two years ago at the state-run Virgen de la Asuncion youth shelter.

AP Photo/ Oliver de Ros

Honduran migrants walk along the roadside through Esquipulas, Guatemala, as they make their way toward the U.S. border. The latest caravan of Honduran migrants hoping to reach the U.S. has crossed into Guatemala.

AP/PTI

An effigy representing the Devil is burned during the Virgin of the Immaculate Conception celebrations in Antigua, Guatemala. Catholics hold their neighbor days-long annual fair in honor of their patron saint, the Virgin of the Immaculate Conception, whose official feast day is Dec. 8.

AP/PTI

Evacuees from the Volcano of Fire area arrive to an emergency shelter in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Evacuees from the Volcano of Fire area rest at an emergency shelter in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Firefighters patrol near the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Volcan de Fuego or Volcano of Fire blows outs a thick cloud of ash in Antigua, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

The Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, spews hot molten lava and ash from its crater in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

The Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, spews hot molten lava and ash from its crater in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

In this image taken with a long exposure, the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, spews hot molten lava from its crater in El Rodeo, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A cloud of red ash hovers over a highway close to the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, in El Rodeo, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

The Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, spews hot molten lava from its crater in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP/PTI Photo

In this image taken with a long exposure, the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, spews hot molten lava from its crater in Antigua, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

The Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, spews hot molten lava from its crater in Escuintla, Guatemala. Disaster coordination authorities have asked several communities in Guatemala to evacuate and go to safe areas after an increased eruption of the Volcano of Fire.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Volcan de Fuego or Volcano of Fire blows outs a thick cloud of ash in Antigua, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Salvadoran migrants cross the Suchiate river, the border between Guatemala and Mexico. A new group of Central American migrants has started on its way North with the stated purpose to make to the United States. The third caravan tried to cross the bridge between Guatemala and Mexico, but Mexican authorities told them they would have to show passports and visas and enter in groups of 50 for processing. The Salvadorans expressed misgivings that they would be deported, so they turned around and waded across a shallow stretch of the river to enter Mexico.

AP Photo/Oscar Rivera

A new group of Central American migrants are met by Mexican Federal Police after the migrants waded in mass across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

A Mexican Federal Police helicopter flies close to the Suchiate River that connects Mexico and Guatemala, in order to create a downwash force to discourage a new group of Central American migrants bound for the U.S border, in wading across the river, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

A new group of Central American migrants wade in mass across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

A new group of Central American migrants bound for the U.S border wade in mass across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. The first group was able to cross the river on rafts — an option now blocked by Mexican Navy river and shore patrols.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

Central American migrants walking to the U.S. start their day departing Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico. Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the border, a growing throng of Central American migrants resumed their advance toward the U.S. border early Sunday in southern Mexico. Their numbers swelled to about 5,000 overnight.

AP/PTI

A group of migrants rests at the central park in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico. About 2,000 Central American migrants who circumvented Mexican police at a border bridge and swam, forded and floated across the river from Guatemala decided on Saturday to re-form their mass caravan and continue their trek northward toward the United States.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

Guatemalan Health Minister workers fumigate on a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River connecting Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. Guatemala's migration agency confirmed that another group of about 1,000 migrants crossed into the country from Honduras on Sunday.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

This frame grab from video provided by Televisa, shows migrants bound for the U.S.-Mexico border waiting on a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River, connecting Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. The gated entry into Mexico via the bridge has been closed. The U.S. president has made it clear to Mexico that he is monitoring its response. On Thursday he threatened to close the U.S. border if Mexico didn't stop the caravan.

Televisa via AP

Migrants tired of waiting to cross into Mexico, jumped from a border bridge into the Suchiate River, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. Some of the migrants traveling in a mass caravan towards the U.S.-Mexico border organized a rope brigade to ford its muddy waters.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

A Honduran migrant mother and child cower in fear as they are surrounded by Mexican Federal Police in riot gear, at the border crossing in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Thousands of Honduran migrants rush across the border towards Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. Migrants broke down the gates at the border crossing and began streaming toward a bridge into Mexico. After arriving at the tall, yellow metal fence some clambered atop it and on U.S.-donated military jeeps. Young men began violently tugging on the barrier and finally succeeded in tearing it down.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

Honduran migrants walking to the U.S. start their day departing Chiquimula, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Honduran migrants bound to the U.S border sit on trailers in Zacapa, Guatemala. The group of some 2,000 Honduran migrants hit the road in Guatemala again hoping to reach the United States despite US President Donald Trump's threat to cut off aid to Central American countries that don't stop them.

AP/PTI

Honduran migrant Omar Orella pushes fellow migrant Nery Maldonado Tejeda in a wheelchair, as they travel with hundreds of other Honduran migrants making their way the U.S., near Chiquimula, Guatemala. Maldonado said he lost his legs in 2015 while riding "The Beast," a northern-bound cargo train in Mexico, and that this is his second attempt to reach the U.S.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A faint Honduran migrant woman is helped as Guatemalan police temporarily block the road after her caravan crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala.

AP/PTI Photo

Honduran migrants walk past a roadblock of Guatemalan police as they make their way to the U.S., in Esquipulas, Guatemala. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A boy in costume clutching a Guatemalan flag sits outside a local fast food restaurant as he waits with his father for a march to start against Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales and corruption in Guatemala City.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Demonstrators gather at Constitution Square to protest Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales and rally in support of the fight against corruption in Guatemala City. Thousands marched to protest Morales' decision to end the work of a U.N. anti-corruption commission that has helped lead high-profile graft probes targeting dozens of powerful people, including one involving Morales.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Police take position around Guatemalan Congress during a protest against the government of President Jimmy Morales, in Guatemala City. 0President Morales had announced that he would not renew the U.N.-backed commission investigating corruption in the country for another two-year mandate, giving the commission until the end of its current term in September 2019 to transfer all its functions to Guatemalan institutions.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

People gather at the Plaza de la Constitucion in Guatemala City at the end of an anti-abortion march. The march was in support of a new bill that expands the criminalization of abortion and could subject women who have miscarriages to prosecution. The proposed legislation has been approved twice by Congress and needs a third approval.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

Firecrackers go off as a supporter in favor of a decision by Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales to shut down a U.N.-sponsored anti-graft commission led by Ivan Velasquez, protests outside the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, headquarters in Guatemala City.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

People protest against a decision by Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City. .

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

People protest against a decision by Guatemala's President Jimmy Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City. Last week the Supreme Court allowed a request brought by the CICIG and Guatemalan prosecutors to strip Morales' immunity from prosecution to go to Congress for consideration.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

People burn an effigy of Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales during a protest against a decision by Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City. Morales announced that he is shutting down the commission that pressed a number of high-profile corruption probes, including one pending against the president himself over purported illicit campaign financing.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

Stuffed toy animals wrapped in aluminum foil representing migrant children separated from their families are displayed in protest in front of the United States embassy in Guatemala City. Bowing to pressure from anxious allies, President Donald Trump abruptly reversed himself and signed an executive order halting his administration’s policy of separating children from their parents when they are detained illegally crossing the U.S. border.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

A mechanical shovel causes clouds of ash to rise during the reparation of a road that connects the city of Antigua with the Pacific coast, that was destroyed during the Volcan de Fuego or "Volcano of Fire" eruption, in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala.

AP/PTI Photo

People walk amid a cloud of ash due to the work of mechanical shovels searching for relatives who disappeared after the Volcan de Fuego or "Volcano of Fire" eruption, in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Search and recovery volunteers walk next to a clouds of dust caused by a bulldozer on the flanks of the Volcano of Fire in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala.

AP/PTI

Angelica Maria Alvarez rests, exhausted inside her home destroyed by the eruption of the the Volcan de Fuego or "Volcano of Fire," in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala. Alvarez is still searching for the remains of more than 10 family members, including her husband and two daughters.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Street preacher Ilario Gutierrez speaks through his portable sound system as he walks the streets of San Juan Alotenango, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

A rescuer looks for bodies in the lahar devastated area close to where the Las Lajas bridge used to be, after the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, in El Rodeo, Guatemala. Guatemala's disaster agency said that it is resuming the search for bodies after a weeklong suspension.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

Survivors of the Volcan de Fuego or "Volcano of Fire" eruption, gather at a church serving as a shelter in Escuintla, Guatemala. More than 4,000 people remained in shelters after last the June 3 eruption, where aid has begun arriving.

AP/PTI

Rescue workers arrive to the disaster zone to search for remains of people killed by the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala. The volcano's initial eruption on June 3 killed at least 110 people and left about about 200 missing.

AP/PTI

Eufemia Garcia Ixpata shows journalists a fridge holding what she believes to be the bones of her brother-in-law, found in one of her family's homes, after the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, during search and recovery efforts in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala. The volcano's initial eruption on June 3 killed at least 110 people and left about about 200 missing.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, blows outs a thick cloud of ash, as seen from San Juan Alotenango, Guatemala. Guatemala's government suspended the search for the dead, saying wet weather and still-hot volcanic material were too dangerous for rescuers.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A baby, survivor of the Volcan de Fuego or "Volcano of Fire" eruption, sleeps at a shelter in Escuintla, Guatemala. Disaster agency Conred said more than 3,000 workers were attending to families affected by the eruption, and about 3,700 displaced people were being housed in shelters.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Bryan Rivera cries after looking at the remains of his house, after his family went missing during the Volcan de Fuego or "Volcano of Fire" eruption, in San Miguel Los Lotes, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Moisés Castillo

Survivors of the Volcan de Fuego or "Volcano of Fire" eruption, gather at a shelter in Alotenago, Guatemala. Guatemalan prosecutors ordered an investigation into whether emergency protocols were followed properly, as many residents were caught by the eruption with little or no time to evacuate.

AP/PTI

Female family members of Erick Rivas, 20, who died in the hospital after suffering burns from the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, carry his remains to the Catholic church to bury him in San Juan Alotenango, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," releases a white plume of smoke as firefighters carry a stretcher during their rescue and recovery efforts in El Rodeo, Guatemala.

AP/PTI

A rescue worker carries a flock of farm birds rescued from homes destroyed by the Volcan de Fuego eruption, in El Rodeo, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Cows lie dead amid steam rising from the hot volcanic ash following a light rain, near the Volcan de Fuego, in the El Rodeo hamlet of Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Crates of soda pop bottles stored on the rooftop of a home are blanketed with volcanic ash while the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," blows out a plume of smoke and ash, in Escuintla, Guatemala. Rescuers were concerned about possible dangers posed not only by more volcanic flows but also rain. Authorities have said the window is closing on the chances of finding anyone else alive in the devastation.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Clouds of ash rise from the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," seen from the El Rodeo hamlet of Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP/PTI Photo

INFERNO Guatemala’s Fuego volcano erupted on June 3, engulfing villages in lava flows and killing scores of people

Photograph by Getty Images

Residents evacuate after a new flow of searing hot volcanic material down the slopes of the Volcano of Fire in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

A dead cow lays in the disaster zone near the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Police officers move in the disaster zone near the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP/PTI

Firefighters work in the disaster zone blanketed in volcanic ash near the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," in the El Rodeo hamlet of Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Rescue workers take a break amid volcanic ash blanketing the disaster zone near the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," in the El Rodeo hamlet of Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Rescue workers search in El Rodeo, one of the hamlets in the disaster area near the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

This aerial view shows the disaster zone near the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire," in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

In this photo released by Guatemalan National Civil Police, shows an aerial view of the disaster zone, blanketed in volcanic ash after the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, or "Volcano of Fire" in Escuintla, Guatemala. .

Guatemalan National Civil Police via AP

People carry the coffins of seven people to the cemetery who died during the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego in San Juan Alotenango, Guatemala. Residents of villages skirting the volcano began mourning the dead after an eruption buried them in searing ash and mud.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

A resident cries after she was safely evacuated from her home near the Volcan de Fuego, in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP/PTI Photo

Boris Rodriguez, 24, who is searching for his wife, cries after seeing the condition of his neighborhood, destroyed by the erupting Volcan de Fuego, in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros

Volcanic ash covers parked motorcycles, brought by the Fuego Volcano, in Antigua Guatemala. Volcan del Fuego is one of the most active volcanoes in Central America.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

A truck is covered in volcanic ash spewed by Volcan de Fuego, in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

A resident cradles his dog after rescuing him near the Volcan de Fuego, in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Luis Soto

Firefighters remove a body recovered near the Volcan de Fuego in Escuintla, Guatemala.

AP Photo/Oliver de Ros