photos

Automatic Rifles

Cartoon by Irfan

A Ruger AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, center, the same model, though in gray rather than black, used by the shooter in a Texas church massacre two days earlier, sits on display with other rifles on a wall in a gun shop in Lynnwood, Washington.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Gun shop owner Tiffany Teasdale-Causer poses for a photo with a Ruger AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, the same model, though in gray rather than black, used by the shooter in a Texas church massacre two days earlier, in Lynnwood, Washington.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Clark Aposhian, chairman of the Utah Shooting Sports Council, demonstrates how a little-known device called a "bump stock" works when attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah.

AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Shooting instructor Frankie McRae illustrates the grip on an AR-15 rifle fitted with a "bump stock" at his 37 PSR Gun Club in Bunnlevel, North Carolina. The stock uses the recoil of the semiautomatic rifle to let the finger "bump" the trigger, making it different from a fully automatic machine gun, which are illegal for most civilians to own.

AP Photo/Allen G. Breed