photos

Migrant caravan

A female migrant carrying a child moves away from Mexican National Guards blocking the passage of a group of migrants near Tapachula, Mexico. Hundreds of Central American migrants crossed the Suchiate River into Mexico from Guatemala after a days-long standoff with security forces.

AP/PTI

Central American migrants cross the Suchiate River from Tecun Uman, Guatemala, to Mexico. Migrants hoping to reach the United States marooned in Guatemala waded en masse across a river leading to Mexico in an attempt to convince authorities there to allow them passage through the country.

AP/PTI

Migrant youth fight over cigarettes on the Mexican side of the Suchiate River near Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on the border with Guatemala. Some Central American migrants are stranded in a sort of no-man’s land on the river border between Guatemala and Mexico after running up against lines of Mexican National Guard troops the previous day.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

A Mexican National Guard detains a Central American migrant after he crossed the Suchiate River with a group of migrants from Guatemala into Mexico near Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Central American migrants carry children as they run across the Suchiate River from Guatemala to Mexico, near Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

Central American migrants cross the Suchiate River by foot from Tecun Uman, Guatemala, to Mexico.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Migrants gather at the bridge spanning the Suchiate River in Tecun Uman, Guatemala at the border with Mexico.

AP Photo/Santiago Billy

Migrants sit at the bridge spanning the Suchiate River in Tecun Uman, Guatemala. More than a thousand Central American migrants hoping to reach United States marooned in Guatemala were preparing to again walk en masse across a bridge leading to Mexico in an attempt to convince authorities there to allow them passage through the country.

AP/PTI

Migrants from Central America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa line up for a meal donated by volunteers from the U.S., at the foot of the Puerta Mexico bridge that crosses to Brownsville, Texas, in downtown Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, Mexico. Hundreds of migrants, some of whom have been in line for months, are awaiting their turn to request asylum in the U.S.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Central American migrants gather on top of a parked freight train, some sleeping, during their journey toward the US-Mexico border, in Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico, at sunrise. Hundreds of migrants wait for the train known as "The Beast" as it once again rumbles through the night loaded with people headed toward the U.S. border after a raid on a migrant caravan threatened to end the practice of massive highway marches through Mexico.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Central American migrants cram into a freight train during their journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border, in Ixtepec, Oaxaca State, Mexico. "They're riding the train again, that's a fact," said migrant rights activist Rev. Alejandro Solalinde, who's shelter now houses about 300 train-riding migrants. "It's going to go back to the way it was, the (Mexican) government doesn't want them to be seen.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

Central American migrants ride atop a freight train during their journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border, in Ixtepec, Oaxaca State, Mexico. The once large caravan of about 3,000 people was essentially broken up by an immigration raid on Monday, as migrants fled into the hills, took refuge at shelters and churches or hopped passing freight trains.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A Honduran migrant shows a processing bracelet given by the Mexican migration authorities in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas State, Mexico. Hundreds of Central American migrants are walking and hitchhiking through the region as part of a new caravan of migrants hoping to reach the United States.

AP/PTI

Honduran migrants walk along the roadside through Esquipulas, Guatemala, as they make their way toward the U.S. border. The latest caravan of Honduran migrants hoping to reach the U.S. has crossed into Guatemala.

AP/PTI

U.S.-bound migrants walk along the roadside as they leave San Pedro Sula, Honduras, at dawn. Yet another caravan of Central American migrants set out overnight from Honduras, seeking to reach the U.S. border, following the same route as thousands on at least three caravans last year.

AP/PTI Photo

Migrants run as tear gas is thrown by U.S. Border Protection officers to the Mexican side of the border fence after they climbed the fence to get to San Diego, Calif., from Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

A migrant jumps the border fence to get into the U.S. side to San Diego, California, from Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

A U.S. Border Protection officer stands under the rain as he watches the border fence between the U.S. side and San Diego, California, from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

Migrants looks for a place to jump the border fence to get into the U.S. side to San Diego, California, from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

A migrant family from Honduras climb over the border fence inside the United States from Tijuana, Mexico, in the presence of the border patrol. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves into border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

Migrants run after crossing the border fence through a hole to enter the United States to San Diego, from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves into border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

A Honduran family climbs the border fence in hopes to enter the United States to San Diego, from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves into border patrol agents.

AP/PTI

A couple of Honduran migrants kiss outside of a tent in the morning while a man gets a shave, foreground, inside an empty warehouse that opened its doors to migrants in downtown Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

An Honduran migrant climbs the U.S. border fence to jump inside the United States to San Diego, from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

A couple of Honduran migrants climb to the top of the U.S. border fence to look inside the United States to San Diego, from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP/PTI

A Honduran migrant walks inside the United States after jumping the U.S. border fence as seen from a hole on the border fence in Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

A Honduran migrant grabs his son as they climb the U.S. border fence before jumping into the U.S. to San Diego, California, from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

A Honduran youth jumps from the U.S. border fence in Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

Honduran migrants help each other to cross over the U.S. border wall to San Diego, California, from Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Moises Castillo

A migrant is taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents after crossing the U.S. border wall into San Diego, California, seen from Tijuana, Mexico.

AP/PTI

Immigrant rights activists are arrested by border patrol agents during a protest at the border wall in San Diego, California.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

U.S. Border Patrol agents make arrests during a pro-migration protest by members of various faith groups showing support for Central American asylum-seekers who arrived in recent caravans and calling for an end to migrant detentions and deportations, in San Diego as seen through the border fence from Tijuana, Mexico. Dozens of protestors were arrested for trespassing as they tried to approach the border wall, and one person for assaulting an officer.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Honduran migrant Helda Lainez, 38, is helped by Mexican first responders after falling from the U.S. border wall and hurting her ankle while trying to cross, in Tijuana, Mexico. After falling, Lainez was unable to make it over the wall, and her 3-year-old and 1-year-old children who had crossed before her were taken into custody by the Border Patrol.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

A Honduran migrant and her daughter peer through the U.S. border wall, moments before suddenly squeezing through a gap and pushing through fencing to exit on the U.S. side, in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Workers add new sections to the U.S. border wall, seen from Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall illegally and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Honduran migrant Jonatan Matamoros Flores, 33, who arrived in October with a migrant caravan, climbs the U.S. border wall to stand atop it before returning to the Mexican side in Tijuana, Mexico. U.S. inspectors at the main border crossing in San Diego are processing up to about 100 asylum claims day, leaving thousands of migrants waiting in Tijuana, while some are avoiding the wait by crossing illegally to turn themselves in.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Migrant family members move into a hole to cross under the U.S. border wall, aided by two local guides, in Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall illegally and hand themselves in to Border Patrol agents to request asylum.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

A Honduran migrant crawls through a hole under the U.S. border fence in Playas de Tijuana, Mexico. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall and hand themselves in to border patrol agents.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Three-year-old Honduran migrant Charlot Andrea looks back toward her grandmother and step-grandfather in Mexico from atop a rise in San Ysidro, California after she and her mother Rachel Rivera, 19, holding her hand, crossed under the U.S. border wall through a hole, as they plan to surrender to the U.S. border patrol and request asylum, seen from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico. Weeping as she stayed behind in Tijuana with her Mexican husband, the little girl's grandmother Yesenia said her daughter and granddaughter joined the migrant caravan to flee an abusive husband back in Honduras.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

A Honduran migrant climbs the border wall separating Tijuana, Mexico and San Diego, before crossing to the U.S with his son in Tijuana, Mexico. Aid workers and humanitarian organizations expressed concerns Thursday about the unsanitary conditions at the sports complex in Tijuana where more than 6,000 Central American migrants are packed into a space adequate for half that many people and where lice infestations and respiratory infections are rampant.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Rescuers hold a Honduran migrant who tried to cross the U.S. border by the sea in Tijuana beach, Mexico.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

People headed across the U.S. border walk up a ramp at the El Chaparral pedestrian border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Brittany Rios, of Honduras, center, carries stuffed animals in a wicker basket as her family leaves a shelter for members of the Central American migrant caravan in Tijuana, Mexico. Authorities in Tijuana said they have begun moving Central American migrants from an overcrowded shelter on the border to an events hall further away.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

A U.S. Border Patrol agent pats down Honduran migrants after they crossed onto U.S territory from Tijuana, Mexico. Thousands of migrants who traveled via a caravan members want to seek asylum in the U.S. but may have to wait months because the U.S. government only processes about 100 of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing in San Diego.

AP Photo/Felix Marquez

A woman searches a shower and rain flooded area for a toilet in acceptable condition at a sports complex sheltering thousands of Central Americans hoping to enter the U.S., in Tijuana, Mexico. Aid workers and humanitarian organizations expressed concerns Thursday about the unsanitary conditions at the sports complex in Tijuana where more than 6,000 Central American migrants are packed into a space adequate for half that many people and where lice infestations and respiratory infections are rampant.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

A migrant rests inside a blanket cocoon tied to keep him from rolling off the spectator stands while sleeping, at a sports complex where more than 5,000 Central American migrants are sheltering in Tijuana, Mexico. As Mexico wrestles with what to do with the thousands of people camped out in the border city of Tijuana, President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's government signaled that it would be willing to house the migrants on Mexican soil while they apply for asylum in the United States, a key demand of U.S. President Donald Trump.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

A Central American migrant is stopped by U.S. agents who order him to go back to the Mexican side of the border, after a group of migrants got past Mexican police at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico at the border with San Ysidro, California.

AP Photo/Pedro Acosta

Migrants push past Mexican police at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico as they try to reach the United States.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

A Honduran migrant converses with U.S border agents on the other side of razor wire after they fired tear gas at migrants pressuring to cross into the U.S. from Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Migrants walk up a riverbank at the Mexico-U.S. border after pushing past a line of Mexican police at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico as they try to reach the U.S.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Migrants in Mexico stand amid tear gas launched by U.S. agents at the border with the U.S., right of fence, after a group of migrants pushed past Mexican police at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Migrants from Central America yell through a border wall at a U.S. Border Patrol agent after he pulled down a banner in San Diego. Migrants approaching the U.S. border from Mexico were enveloped with tear gas after a few tried to breach the fence separating the two countries.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

A migrant runs from tear gas launched by U.S. agents, amid members of the press covering the Mexico-U.S. border, after a group of migrants got past Mexican police at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants peer through the border wall after pushing past Mexican police at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico as they try to reach the U.S.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

A migrant waves an Honduran flag as U.S. border agents stand guard at the Mexico-U.S. border, seen from Tijuana, Mexico as a group of migrants tries to reach the U.S.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants gather at the Mexico-U.S. border after getting past a line of Mexican police at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico as they try to reach the U.S.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants along the river at the Mexico-U.S. border after getting past a line of Mexican police at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico as they try to reach the U.S. The mayor of Tijuana has declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with the approximately 5,000 Central American migrants who have arrived in the city.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants walk across a riverbank at the Mexico-U.S. border after getting past a line of Mexican police at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico as they try to reach the U.S.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants run from tear gas launched by U.S. agents, amid photojournalists covering the Mexico-U.S. border, after a group of migrants got past Mexican police at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants move up a riverbank at the Mexico-U.S. border after getting past a line of Mexican police at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico as they try to reach the U.S.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

A Honduran migrant lies on the riverbank as Mexican police move away from tear gas fired by U.S. agents at the Mexico-U.S. border in Tijuana, Mexico as a group of migrants try to pressure their way into the U.S.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Honduran migrant Janet Zuniga holds her five-month-old son Linder, as he receives medical treatment outside a shelter in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

A migrant carries a child past Mexican police who stand guard outside the Benito Juarez Sports Center which is serving as a shelter for migrants in Tijuana, Mexico. The mayor of Tijuana has declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with thousands of Central American migrants who have arrived.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Omar Angel, of Honduras, fills out paper work to return home with the International Organization of Migration, in front of the shelter housing members of the migrant caravan in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

A boy eats as others wait in line for dinner outside of a shelter housing members of the migrant caravan in Tijuana, Mexico. A day after a march by members of the migrant caravan turned into an attempt to breach the U.S. border with Mexico, many migrants appeared sullen, wondering whether the unrest had spoiled whatever possibilities they might have had for making asylum cases.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

People ride horses near the U.S.-Mexico border structure in San Diego. The mayor of Tijuana has declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with the approximately 5,000 Central American migrants who have arrived in the city.

AP/PTI

Honduran migrant Leticia Nunes holds her daughter Mailyn as she stands with a small group of other migrants in front of a line of Mexican police in riot gear, when they tried to cross the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico. The group of Central American migrants marched peacefully to the border crossing to demand better conditions and push to enter the U.S.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

A migrant child looks up at a Mexican police officer in riot gear at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico. A small group of Central American migrants marched peacefully to a border crossing in Tijuana to demand better conditions and push to enter the U.S.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Elias Lopez, a three-year-old Honduran migrant, plays in between the shields of a line of Mexican riot police, when the group he was part of tried to cross the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico. The child is part of a group of Central American migrants that marched peacefully to the border crossing to demand better conditions and push to enter the U.S.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Central American migrants get a ride on a truck from Mexicali to Tijuana, Mexico. Migrants camped in Tijuana after traveling in a caravan to reach the U.S are weighing their options after a U.S. court blocked President Donald Trump's asylum ban for illegal border crossers.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Roney Santos, left, and Benjamin Perez, from Honduras, who are traveling with a caravan of Central American migrants, use cardboard to rest on the pavement before eating dinner in downtown Mexicali, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

A police officer helps Central American migrants get a ride on trucks going from Mexicali to Tijuana, Mexico. Migrants camped in Tijuana after traveling in a caravan to reach the U.S weighing their options after a U.S. court blocked President Donald Trump's asylum ban for illegal border crossers.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants, who are part of a Central American migrant caravan, leave Mexicali for Tijuana, Mexico. Tensions have built as nearly 3,000 migrants from the caravan poured into Tijuana in recent days after more than a month on the road, and with many more months likely ahead of them while they seek asylum in the U.S.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Honduran Migrant Glenia Cruz feeds her daughter Aisley, at a shelter in Tijuana, Mexico. Many Central Americans who are camped in Tijuana after crossing Mexico in a caravan said that a protest by local residents over the weekend demanding they leave frightened them and left them feeling more anxious while they try to get into the United States.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Cars line up to cross into the United States from Tijuana, Mexico, seen through barriers topped with concertina wire at the San Ysidro port of entry in San Diego. The United States closed off northbound traffic for several hours at the busiest border crossing with Mexico to install new security barriers a day after hundreds of Tijuana residents protested against the presence of thousands of Central American migrants.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

An anti-migrant demonstrator is surrounded by the press as she argues with a woman during a protest against the presence of thousands of Central American migrants in Tijuana, Mexico. Protesters accused the migrants of being messy, ungrateful and a danger to Tijuana; complained about how the caravan forced its way into Mexico, calling it an "invasion," and voiced worries that their taxes might be spent to care for the group as they wait possibly months to apply for U.S. asylum.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Demonstrators stand under an indigenous statue of Aztec ruler Cuauhtemoc as they protest the presence of thousands of Central American migrants in Tijuana, Mexico. Protesters accused the migrants of being messy, ungrateful and a danger to Tijuana; complained about how the caravan forced its way into Mexico, calling it an "invasion," and voiced worries that their taxes might be spent to care for the group as they wait possibly months to apply for U.S. asylum.

AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Honduran migrant Cristian Andino, 16, sits on top of the border structure expecting top make an illegal crossing into the U.S., seen from the Mexican side where the border meets the Pacific Ocean, as a US border patrol agent stands guard in the U.S. side, in Mexico.

AP/PTI

U.S. Border Patrol agents, left, speak with two Central American migrants as they sit atop the border structure separating Mexico and the United States in Tijuana, Mexico.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

Migrants traveling with a caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, wait in line to board buses in La Concha, Mexico. Buses and trucks are carrying some migrants into the state of Sinaloa along the Gulf of California and further northward into the border state of Sonora. The bulk of the main caravan appeared to be about 1,100 miles from the border, but was moving hundreds of miles per day.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Central American migrants moving as a caravan to the U.S. border get a free ride on a truck past maguey farms as they depart Guadalajara, Mexico. Many say they are fleeing rampant poverty, gang violence and political instability primarily in the Central American countries of Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

A Central American migrant, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, arrives at the Benito Juarez Auditorium that is being as a migrant shelter, in Guadalajara, Mexico.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck carrying coffins, in Irapuato, Mexico.

AP/PTI

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck carrying rolls of steel rebar, in Irapuato, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride in a chicken truck, in Irapuato, Mexico.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, mob trucks hoping to get a ride North, in Irapuato, Mexico. Several thousand Central American migrants marked a month on the road as they hitched rides toward the western Mexico city of Guadalajara.

AP/PTI

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck, in Celaya, Mexico. Local Mexican officials were once again helping thousands of Central American migrants find rides on the next leg of their journey toward the U.S. border.

AP/PTI

A Central American migrant, carrying a representation of the Honduran national flag, arrives in Queretaro, Mexico. Thousands of Central American migrants were back on the move toward the U.S. border, after dedicated Mexico City metro trains whisked them to the outskirts of the capital and drivers began offering rides north.

AP/PTI

A Central American migrant bypasses a subway turnstile after leaving the temporary shelter at the Jesus Martinez stadium, in Mexico City.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Central American migrants ride on the subway after leaving the temporary shelter at the Jesus Martinez stadium, in Mexico City. About 500 Central American migrants headed out of Mexico City to embark on the longest and most dangerous leg of their journey to the U.S. border, while thousands more were waiting one day more at the stadium.

AP/PTI

U.S.-bound Central American migrants begin their morning trek with a free ride on a truck as they leave Cordoba, Veracruz state, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Central American migrants begin their morning trek as part of a thousands-strong caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, as they face the Pico de Orizaba volcano upon departure from Cordoba, Veracruz state, Mexico. A big group of Central Americans pushed on toward Mexico City from a coastal state planning to exit a part of the country that has long been treacherous for migrants seeking to get to the United States.

AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Central American migrants sleep inside a church that opened its doors to members of a caravan who splintered off the main group in order to reach the capital faster, in Puebla, Mexico. Thousands of wary Central American migrants resumed their push toward the United States a day after arguments over the path ahead saw some travelers splinter away from the main caravan, which is entering a treacherous part of its journey through Mexico.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, a ride on in the trunk of a taxi, in Acayucan, Veracruz state, Mexico.

AP Photo / Marco Ugarte

Salvadoran migrants cross the Suchiate river, the border between Guatemala and Mexico. A new group of Central American migrants has started on its way North with the stated purpose to make to the United States. The third caravan tried to cross the bridge between Guatemala and Mexico, but Mexican authorities told them they would have to show passports and visas and enter in groups of 50 for processing. The Salvadorans expressed misgivings that they would be deported, so they turned around and waded across a shallow stretch of the river to enter Mexico.

AP/PTI

Salvadoran migrants cross the Suchiate river, the border between Guatemala and Mexico. A new group of Central American migrants has started on its way North with the stated purpose to make to the United States. The third caravan tried to cross the bridge between Guatemala and Mexico, but Mexican authorities told them they would have to show passports and visas and enter in groups of 50 for processing. The Salvadorans expressed misgivings that they would be deported, so they turned around and waded across a shallow stretch of the river to enter Mexico.

AP Photo/Oscar Rivera

A migrant carries a Mexican and Honduran flag atop a tanker truck as a thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans hoping to reach the U.S. border moves onward from Juchitan, Oaxaca state, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Central American migrants, part of a thousands-strong caravan hoping to reach the U.S., rest in an abandoned hotel in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Honduran migrants, part of the thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans migrants hoping to reach the U.S., listen that there was no more donated food for them, at a makeshift shelter in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico. Thousands of migrants arrived in the town of Matias Romero after an exhausting 40-mile (65-kilometer) trek from Juchitan, Oaxaca, where they failed to get the bus transportation they had hoped for.

AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants walk along the road at dawn in Niltepec, Mexico. The migrant caravan slowly advancing through southern Mexico is demanding that the Mexican government help its 4,000-some members reach Mexico City.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell