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Free Speech

Charlie Hebdo staff killed in the attack include (from left) cartoonist Jean Cabut, aka Cabu, cartoonist Tignous, Georges Wolinski and publisher Charb.

A cartoon style drawing hangs outside France's embassy that reads in Spanish "The pencil is the most peaceful weapon, don't mess with humor" in solidarity with those killed in an attack at the Paris offices of the weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

AP Photo/ Natacha Pisarenko

Some editions of a Spanish regional newspaper fall on a container announcing in their front pages, ''Spain has increased the alert level after jihadist attack in Paris'', with those killed in an attack at the Paris offices of weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Pamplona northern Spain.

AP Photo/ Alvaro Barrientos

Mourners hold signs depicting victim's eyes during a rally in support of Charlie Hebdo, a French satirical weekly newspaper that fell victim to an terrorist attack, at Union Square in New York.

AP Photo/ John Minchillo

Mourners hold signs that translate as "I AM CHARLIE" during a rally in support of Charlie Hebdo, a French satirical weekly newspaper that fell victim to an terrorist attack, at Union Square in New York. 12 people were killed when masked gunmen stormed the Paris offices of the periodical that had caricatured the Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ John Minchillo

Masked gunman fire their weapons outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris on Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Paris residents captured chilling video images of two masked gunmen shooting a police officer after an attack at a French satirical newspaper. In the video, the gunmen armed with assault rifles are seen running up to an injured police officer, who lies squirming on the ground. The police officer raises his hands up before one of the assailants shoots him in the head at a close range.

AP Photo

People stand outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office after a shooting, in Paris.

AP Photo/ Thibault Camus

French President Francois Hollande, center, flanked with security forces arrives outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris.

AP Photo/ Remy De La Mauviniere

An injured person is transported to an ambulance after a shooting, at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris.

AP Photo/ Thibault Camus

Police officers and firemen gather outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris.

AP Photo/ Thibault Camus

An injured person is evacuated outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris. At least 10 people were killed when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire.

AP Photo/ Thibault Camus

At least 10 people were killed when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the offices of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, Paris.

TV Grab

At least 10 people were killed when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the offices of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, Paris.

TV Grab

File: Pakistani model-actor, Veena Malik sentenced to 26 years in jail for blasphemy, in Pakistan.

PTI File Photo

From left, Australian correspondent Peter Greste, Canadian-Egyptian acting bureau chief of Al-Jazeera Mohamed Fahmy, and Egyptian producer Baher Mohammed, appear in a defendant's cage in a courtroom in Cairo, Egypt. An Egyptian court convicted three journalists from Al-Jazeera English and sentenced them to seven years in prison each on terrorism-related charges, bringing widespread criticism that the verdict was a blow to freedom of expression. The three, Greste, Fahmy and Mohammed, have been detained since December charged with supporting the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been declared a terrorist organization, and of fabricating footage to undermine Egypt's national security and make it appear the country was facing civil war.

AP Photo/Heba Elkholy, El Shorouk Newspaper

The Canadian ambassador to Egypt, David Drake, center, attends the sentencing hearing for journalists working for Al-Jazeera in a courtroom in Cairo, Egyp. An Egyptian court convicted three journalists from Al-Jazeera English and sentenced them to seven years in prison each on terrorism-related charges, bringing widespread criticism that the verdict was a blow to freedom of expression. The three, Australian Peter Greste, Canadian-Egyptian Mohamed Fahmy and Egyptian Baher Mohammed, have been detained since December charged with supporting the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been declared a terrorist organization, and of fabricating footage to undermine Egypt's national security and make it appear the country was facing civil war.

AP Photo/Heba Elkholy Newspaper

Speaking up The SFI protests the arrests

Sivaram V.

The Dark Joke C.S. Praveen and P.K. Shihab, editors of Name, Litsokniga

Sivaram V.

Employees of Pakistani Geo News TV hold a rally in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP/PTI

In a blow to free speech Delhi-based publisher Navayana has decided to cancel the agreement for release of the English translation of Sahitya Akademi winner Joe D’Cruz’s first Tamil novel Aazhi Soozh Ulagu (Ocean Ringed World) in the wake of his recent political support for BJP's prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi.
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

A scene from Woody Allen’s latest film, Blue Jasmine, which was not released in India this Friday as the director objected to anti-tobacco adverts having to be inserted into scenes where characters are shown smoking.

Courtesy: Sonyclassics.com

Cate Blanchett in Woody Allen’s latest film, Blue Jasmine, which was not released in India this Friday as the director objected to anti-tobacco adverts having to be inserted into scenes where characters are shown smoking.

Courtesy: Sonyclassics.com

For Democracy A KKM satyagraha before courting arrest

Members of some Muslim organisations addressing media after meeting with actor Kamal Hassan and home Secretary R Rajagopal regarding Kamal's controversial movie 'Vishwaroopam' in Chennai.

PTI Photo/R Senthil Kumar

Actor Kamal Hassan addresses media after meeting Home Secretary R Rajagopal and some Muslim organisation regarding the controversial movie 'Vishwaroopam', in Chennai.

PTI Photo/ R Senthil Kumar

File photo of Renowned sociologist Ashis Nandy. The Supreme Court stayed the arrest of Ashis Nandy for making remarks alleged to be anti-Dalit at the Jaipur Literature Festival.

PTI Photo

Members of the Muslim community protest against the release of Kamal Haasan's movie Vishwaroopam in Madurai.

PTI Photo

Dalit activists protest against Ashis Nandy's controversial remarks on corruption outside Diggi Palace, the venue of Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur

PTI

Renowned sociologist Ashis Nandy kicked up a row while speaking at a session 'Republic of Ideas' at Jaipur Literature Festival in Jaipur when he said that people from OBC, SC and ST communities were the "most corrupt", remarks that came under all round attack. Hours after Nandy made remarks at the ongoing Jaipur Literature Festival, an FIR was lodged with the police against him in Jaipur.

PTI

Salman Rushdie vs all comers Even a virtual Rushdie was banned from the Jaipur LitFest; so imminent, the state said, was the threat of a SIMI attack against the author of The Satanic Verses. Fortunately, the threats turned out to be the state’s own epic work of fiction. After, Rushdie also had a spat with Pankaj Mishra and faced down a stinging review of his memoir, Joseph Anton, by Zoe Heller.

Sorit

Shaheen Dhada and Rinu Srinivasan, who were arrested for their comments over their Facebook post questioning the shutdown in the city for Shiv Sena patriarch Bal Thackeray's funeral, after their release on bail by the Palghar court in Mumbai.

PTI Photo

A school boy takes photographs as sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik completes a sculpture portraying 15-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, in Kolkata.

AP Photo/Bikas Das

Pakistani girls display a poster while sitting at their desk, as their teacher, not shown, talks to them about 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by a Taliban gunman for her role in promoting girls' education in the Swat Valley where she lives, in a school in Islamabad, Pakistan. A Pakistani military spokesman says Yousufzai is in "satisfactory" condition but cautions that the next few days will be critical.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

A protester, wearing sunglasses with slogans, stands in front of picture of Philippine President Benigno Aquino III during a rally against the anti-cybercrime law in front of the Supreme Court in Manila, Philippines.

AP Photo/Aaron Favila

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, hold up the party's flag during a rally against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, burn a representation of a U.S. flag, during a rally against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

policemen create a barricade at the end of an over bridge leading to the U.S. Consulate anticipating a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Kolkata. However, the protestors did not turn up.

AP Photo/Bikas Das

Rapid Action Force personnel patrol a street a day after a protest against an anti-Islam film turned violent in Ahmedabad. Several vehicles were burnt and a police station attacked during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

Female supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, raise their hands during a demonstration against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

People gather during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

People shout slogans during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

A government vehicle in flames during a protest against a US-made anti-Islam film and the publication of blasphemous cartoons in France, in Ahmedabad.

PTI Photo

Police personnel run away after protesters burnt a police station during a protest against a US-made anti-Islam film and the publication of blasphemous cartoons in France, in Ahmedabad.

PTI Photo

Women react as they flee the scene after protestors set fire to vehicles in front of a police station during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

Vehicles set on fire by a mob inside the premises of a police station go up in flames during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

AP Photo/Ajit Solanki

A Bahraini woman uses an iPad to photograph a rally in Diraz, Bahrain against a film made in the United States that denigrates Islam's founding Prophet Muhammad. A few hundred people participated in the march, chanting slogans against the United States and Israel.

AP Photo/Hasan Jamali

Pakistani lawyers chant anti-American slogans as they are blocked by police in Islamabad, Pakistan. Angry lawyers broke police barriers and reached near the diplomatic enclave to condemn a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Muslims shout slogans against the U.S. as they march in a protest rally against the anti-Islam film "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu.

AP Photo/Channi Anand

Muslims shout slogans during a protest rally against the film "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Prophet Muhammad, in New Delhi. Scores of Muslims protested against the anti-Islam film produced in the United States after offering their Friday prayers. The sign reads "Insult towards Prophet Muhammad will not be tolerated. Punish the guilty."

AP Photo/Saurabh Das

Muslims clash with the police during a demonstration against anti-Islam film in front of American Center in Kolkata.

PTI Photo/Ashok Bhaumik

Police in action against Muslims who were marching towards American Centre to protest against anti-Islamic film in Kolkata.

PTI Photo/Swapan Mahapatra

A Pakistani student listens to a speech at a rally to protest against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad at Karachi University in Pakistan. Pakistani Taliban spokesman says the militant group has announced an amnesty for a minister who offered a $100,000 bounty for anyone who kills the maker of an anti-Islam film.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Sri Lankan Muslims hold placards as they shout slogans during a protest outside the U.S. Embassy in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Thousands of Sri Lankan Muslims protested against the American-produced film "Innocence of Muslims” that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP/PTI

School girls shouting anti-US slogans during a protest march against the Anti-Islam film in Srinagar.

PTI Photo/ S Irfan

Bangladeshi Muslims burn a U.S. flag and a coffin of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest over anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

AP Photo/ A.M. Ahad

Muslims burn the U.S. flag during a protest rally against an anti-Islam film which ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu.

AP Photo/ Channi Anand

Muslims burn the U.S. flag and shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest rally against an anti-Islam film which ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu.

AP Photo/ Channi Anand

Indonesian Muslims shout slogans during a protest against an anti-Islam film that has sparked anger among followers, outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia.

AP Photo/ Achmad Ibrahim

Muslim protesters burn an American flag during a protest against an anti-Islam film produced in the US, in Makassar, Indonesia. The U.S. has closed its diplomatic missions across Indonesia due to continuing demonstrations over the film "Innocence of Muslims," which denigrates the Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Abbas Sandji

Muslims protest against an anti-Islam film in Moradabad.

PTI Photo

Muslim demonstrators march to the U.S. Embassy during a protest against the anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" and the publication of caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad by a French satirical weekly outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

AP Photo/ Vincent Thian

A Muslim protester holds a placard during a protest against the anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" and a satirical cartoon published in a French magazine deemed insulting to Prophet Muhammad outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

AP Photo/ Lai Seng Sin

A Paramilitary soldier stands guard in front of closed shops during a strike to protest against an anti-Islam film at Budshah Chowk in Srinagar.

PTI Photo

Pakistani protesters hold a banner depicting U.S. President Barack Obama and pastor Terry Jones during a rally in Peshawar, Pakistan as a part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Afghans hold placards reading: "Our leader Mohammed" during a protest against an anti-Islam film in Kabul, Afghanistan.

AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid

Pakistani protesters rally in Quetta, Pakistan as a part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Arshad Butt

Sri Lankan Muslims hit with a broom and sandals on a banner carrying portraits of Pastor Terry Jones, left, U.S. President Barack Obama and Christian activist Steve Klein, right, during a protest in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Hundreds of Muslims in Sri Lanka's capital protested against an anti-Islam film produced in the United States, burning effigies of President Barack Obama.

AP Photo/ Chamila Karunarathne

Yemeni clerics attend a press conference in Sanaa, Yemen. The group condemned an anti-Islam film and the presence of U.S. Marines in Yemen and airstrikes carried out by U.S aircraft in Yemen. An elite Marine rapid response team has arrived in Yemen's capital in the wake of violent protests at the U.S. Embassy over a film critical of Islam.

AP Photo/ Hani Mohammed

Muslim students burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest near the American Center in Kolkata. The students were protesting against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo

Masked Palestinians throw stones towards Israeli security forces, during clashes erupted after demonstration against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Shuafat refugee camp, Jerusalem.

AP Photo/ Bernat Armangue

A Muslim protestor, on ground, tries to block blows as police baton charge during a protest in front of the U.S. embassy in Chennai. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Arun Sankar.K

Pakistani protesters burn a representation of a U.S. flag during a demonstration that is part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, near the US consulate in Peshawar, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Angry protesters strike a poster showing a portrait of U.S. President Barack Obama during a demonstration as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, near the U.S. consulate in Peshawar, Pakistan. Hundreds of angry protesters broke through a barricade outside the U.S. Consulate in Peshawar, sparking clashes with police that left several wounded on both sides.

AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad

Firefighters work to extinguish flames on a government vehicle after it was set on fire by Kashmiri protesters in Srinagar.

AP Photo/ Dar Yasin

A Kashmiri Muslim family watches a protest against the U.S. in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Dar Yasin

Kashmiri Muslim protesters hurl objects at police during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Dar Yasin

Paramilitary soldiers stand near a water tanker vandalised by protesters in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Dar Yasin

Kashmiri Muslims shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Banner reads "Muslims can sacrifice their precious lives for Prophet Muhammad."

AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan

A Kashmiri Muslim protester jumps over a burning tire set up as a road block during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Dar Yasin

Afghan investigators inspect the wreckage of a suicide bomber's car in Kabul, Afghanistan.

AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid)

Brothers of an Afghan mini-bus driver who was killed in a suicide bombing cry at the scene in Kabul, Afghanistan. A female suicide bomber killed 12 people in Kabul in the deadliest single attack claimed to avenge a US film that has sparked a week of deadly protests across the Muslim world.

AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid

Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy representing the United States as they shout slogans during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan

A Pakistani protester holds stone as others hang a flag at the entry of the gate of the U.S. consulate during a demonstration in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

A Pakistani protester spray paints on the wall of the U.S. consulate during a demonstration in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Thousands of supporters of a Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice take part in a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Thousands of supporters of a Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice raise hands during a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan , as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Afghan police stand by burning tires during a protest, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Hundreds of Afghans burned cars and threw rocks at a U.S. military base as a demonstration against an anti-Islam film that ridicules the Prophet Muhammad turned violent in the Afghan capital.

AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid

Thousands of supporters of the Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice take part in a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan against the Anti-Islam film that has outraged the Muslim world.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Afghans burn U.S. and Israeli flags in Kabul, Afghanistan during a protest against the Anti-Islam film which has sparked violent reaction all over the Muslim world.

AP Photo/Ahmad Jamshid

Afghans burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest in Khost, south-east of Kabul, Afghanistan. A few hundred of university students protested against an anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman, in Khost, shouting "death to America."

AP Photo/ Nashanuddin Khan

Activists of Tamil Nadu Thowheed Jamath during a protest against an anti-Islam film, near the U.S. Consulate in Chennai.

PTI Photo/ R Senthil Kumar

Kashmiri Muslim students shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Dar Yasin

Palestinian Hamas supporters burn a U.S. flag during a protest in Gaza City as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Hatem Moussa

A Kashmiri Muslim with his face covered burns a mock American flag as others shout slogans during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/Dar Yasin

Protesters hold black flags and a placard showing an image of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in Chennai.

AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.

Protestors climb the wall of the U.S. Consulate during a protest against an Anti-Islam film in Chennai.

AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.

Bangladeshi Muslims scuffle with the police during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman, in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

AP/PTI

Activists of Tamil Nadu Muslim Munnetra Kazhagam clash with the police during protest against an anti-Islam film, outside of the U.S. Consulate in Chennai.

PTI Photo/R Senthil Kumar

Muslims shout anti-US slogans during a demonstration against an anti-Islamic film in Amritsar.

PTI Photo/Deepak Sharma

Iranian parliament speaker Ali Larijani, center, attends a protest, while a worshipper holds up a poster of US President Barack Obama, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

AP Photo/ Vahid Salemi