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NATO

A U.S. soldier walks past parked armoured vehicles and tanks of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team and 1st Calvary Division, based out of Fort Hood, Texas, as they are unloaded at the port of Antwerp, Belgium. The U.S. military vehicles are on their way to Eastern Europe to take part in the Atlantic Resolve military exercises, in which American troops train together with NATO partners to help ensure stability in Europe..

Photo by AP/PTI

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, center, U.S. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, right, and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, left, speaks during a joint news conference in presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. The U.S. is poised to sign a peace agreement with Taliban militants on Saturday aimed at bringing an end to 18 years of bloodshed in Afghanistan and allowing U.S. troops to return home from America's longest war.

Photo by AP/PTI

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, right, shakes hands with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, after a joint news conference in presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. The U.S. signed a peace agreement with Taliban militants on Saturday aimed at bringing an end to 18 years of bloodshed in Afghanistan and allowing U.S. troops to return home from America's longest war.

Photo by AP/PTI

U.S. President Donald Trump walks off the podium after the official group photo during a NATO leaders meeting at The Grove hotel and resort in Watford, Hertfordshire, England. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg rejected French criticism that the military alliance is suffering from brain death, and insisted that the organization is adapting to modern challenges.

AP Photo/Francisco Seco

A protestor holds a sign during a demonstration against the NATO summit and U.S. President Donald Trump's visit, in London. Trump and his NATO counterparts were gathering in London to mark the alliance's 70th birthday amid deep tensions as spats between leaders expose a lack of unity that risks undermining military organization's credibility.

AP/PTI Photo

German Chancellor Angela Merkel poses outside 10 Downing Street, before a meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit, in London.

AP/PTI

US President Donald meets with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at Winfield House, in London.

AP/PTI

US President Donald meets French President Emmanuel Macron at Winfield House, in London.

AP/PTI

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, U.S. first lady Melania Trump, center right, and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte, left, arrive for a reception for NATO leaders at 10 Downing Street in London. U.S. President Donald Trump and his NATO counterparts were gathered in London Tuesday to mark the alliance's 70th birthday amid deep tensions as spats between leaders expose a lack of unity that risks undermining military organization's credibility.

AP Photo/Frank Augstein

A supporter of US President Donald Trump waves the U.S. flag outside Buckingham Palace in London. Trump and his NATO counterparts were gathering in London to mark the alliance's 70th birthday amid deep tensions as spats between leaders expose a lack of unity that risks undermining military organization's credibility.

AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, centre, takes her seat with Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Chancellor of Germany Angela Merkel, behind, before a formal group photo during a formal reception for the heads of the NATO countries, at Buckingham palace in London. Leaders from across the 29-member trans-Atlantic alliance are gathered in London to mark the 70th anniversary of NATO.

Yui Mok/Pool via AP

Leaders of the NATO alliance countries, and its secretary general, join Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles the Prince of Wales, for a group picture during a reception at Buckingham Palace in London as they gathered to mark 70-years of the alliance.

Yui Mok/Pool via AP

NATO's Secretary General Jen Stoltenberg, center, makes opening remarks at the Meeting of the North Atlantic Council in Foreign Ministers' Session 1 at the US State Department in Washington. Sitting with him are from l-r, Turkey's Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, Britain's Ambassador to NATO Sarah MacIntosh, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Deputy Secretary General of NATO Rose Gottemoeller, Assistant Secretary General for Political Affairs and Security Policy (ASGPASP) Alejandro Alvargonzalez and Jorgen Christian Jorgensen is the Secretary of the North Atlantic Council.

AP/PTI

US President Donald Trump shakes hands as he meets with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.

AP/PTI

US President Donald Trump, accompanied by National Security Adviser John Bolton, third from left, first lady Melania Trump, fourth from right, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Doug Silliman, third from right, and senior military leadership, speaks to members of the media at Al Asad Air Base, Iraq.

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

U.S. and NATO forces pose for a photograph during a ceremony on Christmas Day at the Resolute Support Headquarters, in Kabul, Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Rahmat Gul

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, shakes hands with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg prior to a meeting at NATO headquarters in Brussels. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo took aim at China, Iran, Russia and others for violating numerous treaties and multi-state agreements and questioned whether many pillars of international trade and diplomacy are still relevant.

AP Photo/Francisco Seco, Pool

Soldiers carry coffins containing the bodies of three fallen service members during a ceremony at the Prague's Vaclav Havel Airport, Czech Republic.

AP Photo/Petr David Josek

Family members mourn during a ceremony at the Prague's Vaclav Havel Airport, Czech Republic. The ceremony was held to tribute three Czech soldiers who were killed while on a foot patrol as part of a NATO forces near the Bagram military base in the province of Parwan in eastern Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Petr David Josek

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a press conference after a summit of heads of state and government at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. NATO leaders gather in Brussels for a two-day summit.

AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert

French first lady Brigitte Macron, center, walks in heels across the gravel to meet photographers during a NATO spouse program at the African Museum in Tervuren, Belgium.

AP Photo/Virginia Mayo

NATO spouses pose for a group photo during a NATO spouses program at the African Museum in Tervuren, Belgium. From left, Malgorzata Tusk, wife of European Council President Donald Tusk, Ermine Erdogan, wife of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Ingrid Schulerud, wife of NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, Amelie Derbaudrenghien, the partner of Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel, French first lady Brigitte Macron, Ulla Lofven, wife of Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven and Karin Ratas, wife of Estonian Prime Minister Juri Ratas.

AP Photo/Virginia Mayo

Leaders gather during a dinner at the Art and History Museum at the Park Cinquantenaire in Brussels. NATO leaders gathered in Brussels for a two-day summit to discuss Russia, Iraq and their mission in Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert, Pool

U.S. President Donald Trump smiles prior to a dinner of leaders at the Art and History Museum at the Park Cinquantenaire in Brussels. NATO leaders gathered in Brussels for a two-day summit to discuss Russia, Iraq and their mission in Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert, Pool

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron shake hands during their bilateral meeting in Brussels, Belgium.

AP/PTI

President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel during their bilateral meeting in Brussels, Belgium.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

President Donald Trump, left, talks with Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, as they arrive together for a family photo at a summit of heads of state and government at NATO headquarters in Brussels.

AP/ PTI Photo

From left, French First lady Brigitte Macron, US First Lady Melania Trump, Malgorzata Tusk, Husband of Luxembourg's prime minister Gauthier Destenay, First Lady of Turkey Emine Gulbaran Erdogan, Partner of Estonia's Prime Minister Karin Ratas, Partner of Slovenia's Prime Minister Mojca Stropnik, Partner of Sweden's Prime Minister Ulla Lofven, Partner of Bulgaria's President Desislava Radeva, Belgian Prime Minister Michel's partner Amelie Derbaudrenghien and NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg's partner Ingrid Schulerud pose ahead of a NATO spouses dinner at Jubilee Museum in Brussels, Belgium.

Stephanie Lecocq/Pool Photo via AP

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, U.S. President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May, front row from left, watch a fly-by during a summit of heads of state and government at NATO headquarters in Brussels. NATO leaders gather in Brussels for a two-day summit to discuss Russia, Iraq and their mission in Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Actress and humanitarian Angelina Jolie, left, talks with Former Secretary General of NATO George Robertson, during a service marking the 200th anniversary of the Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George, at St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

AP/PTI Photo

A US missile streaks the Damascus night sky on April 14

Photograph by AP

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, right, and the Special Envoy for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Angelina Jolie leave after a media briefing at NATO headquarters in Brussels.

AP/PTI

German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier, center, and his wife, Elke Büdenbender, speakto German troops next to a Torpedo fighter jet on a remote airbase in northern Jordan. Steinmeier said moving German troops from Turkey to Jordan as part of an international military campaign against Islamic State extremists was "the right choice. Germany carries out reconnaissance and refueling missions over Syria and Iraq, where IS once held large areas.

AP Photo/Sam McNeil

Backdropped by posters of Turkey's founding father Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, left, and himself, Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses provincial leaders of his ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), in Ankara, Turkey. Erdogan said Turkey withdrew 40 of its soldiers participating in the drills at NATO's Joint Warfare Centre in Stavanger, Norway, in protest of an incident during which Ataturk, and Erdogan, were reportedly depicted as "enemies." NATO's secretary-general Jens Stoltenberg apologised to Turkey later on Friday.

Pool via AP

U.S. Secretary for Defense Jim Mattis, center, walks off the podium with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, left, and British Defense Minister Gavin Williamson, right, after a group photo of NATO defense ministers at NATO headquarters in Brussels. U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and his NATO counterparts started two days of talks in Brussels looking to expand the military alliance's command structure and drum up more troop contributions for Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Virginia Mayo

U.S. and Afghan security forces inspect the site of a suicide attack on NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghanistan's Interior Ministry says a suicide car bomber has struck a convoy of international forces in the capital, wounding three civilians.

AP/PTI

US President Donald Trump stands with Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel during the playing of National Anthems during arrival at Melsbroek Military Airport in Melsbroek, Belgium. US President Donald Trump is in Belgium to attend a NATO summit and to meet EU and Belgian officials.

AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert

A F35A fighter jet sits on the tarmac at the Amari Airbase in Harjumaa, Estonia. Two U.S. F-35 fighter jets have arrived in NATO member Estonia to take part in NATO drills as the aircraft see their first operational deployment in continental Europe. The planes with stealth technology to avoid detection by radar landed at the Amari air base from the Royal Air Force base in Britain.

AP Photo

German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen, right, and Lithuania's Presidend Dalia Grybauskaite speaks with a soldier during the NATO enhanced forward presence battalion welcome ceremony at the Rukla military base some 130 km (80 miles) west of the capital Vilnius, Lithuania. The NATO enhanced forward presence battalion in Lithuania will be led by framework nation Germany.

AP Photo/Mindaugas Kulbis

US President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron before the first working session of the North Atlantic Council at the NATO summit in Warsaw, Poland.

AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama speaks at the NATO Parliamentary Assembly Spring session in Tirana. NATO's Parliamentary Assembly urged alliance members Monday to stand up to Russia's military assertiveness and to do a better job sharing the burden of collective defense.

AP Photo/Hektor Pustina

A soldier aboard the NATO German warship FGS Bonn watches the docking of the ship at the harbor in Izmir. The FGS Bonn is part of the NATO flotilla patrolling the Aegean Sea in an effort to curb migrant activity between Turkey and Greece.

AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Afghan and foreign soldiers inspect the site of a bomb attack that targeted several armored vehicles belonging to forces attached to the NATO Resolute Support Mission, in downtown of Kabul, Afghanistan. Gen. Abdul Rahman Rahimi, the Kabul city police chief, said that three Afghan civilians were wounded in the attack that damaged one of the vehicles but caused no fatalities.

AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini

British soldiers run at the site of a suicide attack in the heart of Kabul, Afghanistan. The suicide car bomber attacked a NATO convoy traveling through a crowded neighborhood in Afghanistan's capital, killing at least 10 people, including three NATO contractors, authorities said.

AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini

An honor guard soldier adjusts the outfit of a colleague standing in the sunlight before a welcoming ceremony for NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in Bucharest, Romania.

AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda

Australian soldiers shake hands with local employees after an exhibition cricket match at NATO headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan

AP/PTI

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, speaks with British Prime Minister David Cameron as she arrives for the NATO summit at the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, Wales.

AP

U.S. soldiers remove a destroyed vehicle from the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan. An Afghan official said a suicide bomber targeting a NATO convoy in Kabul killed one civilian and wounded three others.

AP Photo/ Massoud Hossaini

U.S. military forces inspect the site of a suicide attack near a U.S. military camp in Kabul, Afghanistan. A Taliban suicide car bomber attacked a foreign motorcade just a couple hundred yards (meters) from the U.S. Embassy, unleashing a blast that injured at least a dozen people and rattled nearby neighborhoods, police officials said.

AP/PTI

NATO and Afghan security forces inspect the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan.

AP/PTI

Russian President Vladimir Putin lights a candle in the Lifegiving Trinity Church in Moscow, Russia. President Vladimir Putin said that Russia will develop an array of new nuclear and conventional weapons to counter recent moves by the U.S. and NATO.

AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Alexei Druzhinin, Presidential Press Service

NATO leaders watch a flypast of military aircraft from NATO member countries on the final day of the summit at the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, south Wales

AP/PTI

Unmarked Military vehicles burn on a country road in the village of Berezove, eastern Ukraine, after a clash between pro-government troops and Russian-backed separatist militia. Separatist rebels have made major strides in their offense against Ukrainian government forces in recent days, drawing on what Ukraine and NATO says is ample support from the Russian military.

AP/PTI

British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko as they attend a NATO-Ukraine round table meeting during a NATO summit at the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, Wales.

AP/PTI

U.S. President Barack Obama greets children as he is welcomed by Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves at Kadriorg Palace in Tallinn, Estonia. Obama is in Estonia for a one day visit where he will meet with Baltic State leaders before heading to the NATO Summit in Wales

AP/PTI

After standoff, Iraq PM Nouri-al-Maliki shows signs he’ll quit in favour of Dawa Party mate Haider al-Abadi. NATO , Arab countries, Iran back new man even as ISIS advance.

U.S. soldiers investigate the scene of an suicide attack in the Torkham, Nangarhar province, Afghanistan. Afghan officials say three Taliban suicide bombers targeted NATO fuel trucks at the border with Pakistan, setting off a gunbattle with police guards.

AP Photo/ Rahmat Gul

This satellite image provided by NATO Saturday June 14, 2014 shows what NATO says is recent Russian tank movements near the border with Ukraine. The image on the left, dated May 30, 2014 shows the deployment of a Russian military unit. This unit was deployed to this location as part of Russia’s build-up of forces along its border with Ukraine. This location is approximately 47 miles (75 kilometres from the Dovzhanskyy, Ukraine border crossing. Please note there are NO Main Battle Tanks on this image. The middle image, dated June 6, 2014, shows the departure of the Russian military unit. However, it shows the arrival of 8 Main Battle Tanks, which were not present on the May 30, 2014 image. The image on the right, dated June 11, 2014, indicates overall, there are 10 Main Battle Tanks in the area (3 parked, 4 in training area, and 3 on low loaders).

AP/PTI

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, left, and NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, right, shake hands after signing a cooperation agreement at NATO headquarters in Brussels. Abe will, in a two-day visit, meet with NATO, EU and Belgian officials.

AP/PTI

NATO's Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, Philip Breedlove, during a news conference at Sao Juliao de Barra fort in Oeiras, near Lisbon, Portugal. During the conference, Breedlove talked about the current crisis in Ukraine, among other issues.

AP Photo/Francisco Seco

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry with British Foreign Minister William Hague at a NATO Enlargement Anniversary group photo prior to a meeting of NATO foreign ministers at NATO headquarters in Brussels.

AP/PTI

A soldier with the NATO- led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) at a religious ceremony on Christmas in Logar province, eastern Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Rahmat Gul

Hafiz Saeed, left, head of Pakistani religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa talks to anti-U. S. cleric Samiul Haq during a jirga or grand meeting, in Peshawar, Pakistan. Participants of the meeting condemn the ongoing U.S. drone strikes targeting militants hiding in Pakistani tribal areas. Due to strikes protesters blocked a road in northwest Pakistan used to truck NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan, the latest sign of rising tension caused by the attacks.

AP/PTI Photo

Pakistani attend an anti-U. S. jirga or grand meeting, in Peshawar, Pakistan. Participants of the meeting condemn the ongoing U.S. drone strikes targeting militants hiding in Pakistani tribal areas. Due to strikes protesters blocked a road in northwest Pakistan used to truck NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan, the latest sign of rising tension caused by the attacks.

AP/PTI Photo

Smoke rises from NATO supply trucks following an attack by militants in the Torkham area near the Pakistan--Afghanistan border in Jalalabad province east of Kabul, Afghanistan. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the strike on a U.S. base in Afghanistan near the border with Pakistan, setting off bombs, torching vehicles and shutting down a key road used by NATO supply trucks.

AP Photo/ Rahmat Gul

Afghan men assist an injured man after a suicide bombing at the gate to a NATO compound in Kabul, Afghanistan. Militants blew up a suicide car bomb at the gate to the NATO compound in Kabul and attacked guards with small-arms fire, killing four guards and two civilians, police said.

AP Photo/Rahmat Gul

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, talks with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, right, and Pakistani Army Chief Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani as they take a walk during a break in a meeting, in Brussels, Belgium.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, laughs as Afghan President Hamid Karzai, left, and Pakistani Army Chief Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani shake hands after a meeting in Brussels, Belgium. The trilateral meeting is to discuss regional security issues, and the 2014 withdrawal of NATO combat forces from Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool

Pakistan's former cricket legend and chairman of Pakistan Movement for Justice Party, Imran Khan, left, addresses his supporters during an anti-NATO rally in Peshawar, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

Pakistanis hold placards and chant slogans during an anti-NATO rally in Karachi, Pakistan. Anti-American sentiment in Pakistan is high after the government's decision to reopen NATO supply lines to Afghanistan and in part due to the continued strikes by American drones aimed at militant targets in tribal areas.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

NATO supply trucks enter Afghanistan from Pakistan at Torkham border crossing in east of Kabul, Afghanistan. The Difah-e-Pakistan group rally at Torkham protests the reopening of the NATO supply line.

AP/PTI

Hafiz Saeed, center, head of a Pakistani religious party Jammat-Ud-Dawa listens to his aid as he attends anti NATO rally in Islamabad. Thousands of Islamists rallied in the Pakistan's capital to protest against the government's decision to allow the U.S. and other NATO countries to resume shipping troop supplies through the country to Afghanistan.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, center, is surrounded by guards as he arrives to attend a rally condemning the movement of NATO supplies to Afghanistan through Pakistan, in Lahore, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary

Supporters of the Defense Council of Pakistan sit on the top of vehicles with party flags as they take part in a rally, in Pakistan. Prominent hardline Islamists led thousands of people in a protest against Pakistan's decision to allow the U.S. and other NATO countries to resume shipping troop supplies through the country to Afghanistan.

AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary

Pakistani former cricket star-turn-politician Imran Khan condemns the movement of NATO supplies to Afghanistan through Pakistan at a rally in Gujranwala near Lahore, Pakistan. Trucks carrying supplies to American and NATO troops in Afghanistan crossed the Pakistani border after a seven-month closure of the supply routes ended earlier this week.

AP Photo/ Aftab Rizvi

Pakistani students of Jamaat-i-Islami burn tire and rally to condemn the resumption of NATO supplies to neighboring Afghanistan through Pakistan, in Peshawar, Pakistan. The first truck carrying supplies to American and NATO troops in Afghanistan has crossed the Pakistani border after a seven-month long closure of the supply routes by Pakistan ended earlier this week. Banner reads "NATO supply is unacceptable."

AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

Oil tankers, which were used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, are parked Karachi, Pakistan. Trucks carrying NATO troop supplies are set to resume shipments to Afghanistan following a deal between the U.S. and Pakistan that ended Islamabad's seven-month blockade.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Maulana Samiul Haq, right, head of a coalition of hardline Islamist religious leaders and politicians 'Defense of Pakistan Council', speaks as a coalition leader Hafiz Mohammad Saeed looks on during a press conference in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The Defense of Pakistan Council announced to launch a protest campaign against the reopening the NATO supply route, Haq said.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

A driver stands on top of a truck carrying NATO Humvees at a terminal in the Pakistani-Afghan border, in Chaman, Pakistan. Trucks carrying NATO troop supplies are set to resume shipments to Afghanistan following a deal between the U.S. and Pakistan that ended Islamabad's seven-month blockade.

AP Photo/ Matiullah Achakzai

A Pakistani mechanic works on an oil tanker, which was used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, while parked with other tankers in Karachi, Pakistan. The Obama administration said that Pakistan was reopening its supply lines into Afghanistan, after the U.S. belatedly issued an apology for the November killing of 24 Pakistani troops in a NATO airstrike.

AP Photo/Shakil Adil

Pakistan's Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar speaks during a news conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague at the Foreign Ministry in Islamabad, Pakistan. Hague said his government wanted to see the NATO supply lines reopened to neighboring Afghanistan.

AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Oil tankers, which were used to transport NATO fuel supplies to neighboring Afghanistan, are parked in a compound in Karachi.

AP/PTI

Afghan villagers gather at a house destroyed in an apparent NATO raid in Logar province, south of Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan officials and residents say a pre-dawn NATO airstrike aimed at militants in eastern Afghanistan killed civilians celebrating a wedding, including women and children.

AP Photo/ Ihsanullah Majroh

Supporters of Pakistan Defense Council, a coalition of Islamic parties, burn a representation of a US flag at rally to condemn the reopening of the NATO supply line to neighboring Afghanistan, in Quetta, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Arshad Butt

Hafiz Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, center, surrounded by guards, attends with his supporters a rally against a possible resumption of NATO supplies to neighboring Afghanistan, in Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistan's parliament has unanimously approved new guidelines for the country in its troubled relationship with the United States, a decision that could pave the way for the reopening of supply lines to NATO troops in neighboring Afghanistan.

AP/PTI

Oil tankers, which were used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, are parked in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

President Barack Obama, left, and British Prime Minister David Cameron, right, help Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, center, find his toe marker during the NATO family photo at the NATO Summit in Chicago.

AP Photo/ Pablo Martinez Monsivais

President Barack Obama, right, shakes hands with with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, left, during their meeting at the NATO Summit in Chicago. With Obama, Karzai thanked Americans for the help their 'taxpayer money' has done in Afghanistan.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Oil tankers, which were used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, are parked in Karachi, Pakistan.

AP Photo/Fareed Khan

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks to the media before government and world leaders arrive at the NATO Summit in Chicago.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Afghan Army soldiers perform Friday prayers at an Afghan Army base in Logar province, east Afghanistan. NATO sits down in Chicago to prepare for the eventual withdrawal of international forces and the hand over of Afghanistan's security to the Afghan National Army.

AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Pakistani protesters burn representation of American flag during a rally to condemn to the reopening of the NATO supply line to neighboring Afghanistan, in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan's president announced that he will attend the upcoming NATO summit in Chicago, accepting an invitation that was given after the country indicated it plans to end its six-month blockade of supplies meant for coalition troops in Afghanistan.

AP Photo / Khalid Tanveer

A man takes nap on one of oil tankers used to transport NATO fuel supplies to neighboring Afghanistan, in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistan's president announced that he will attend the upcoming NATO summit in Chicago, accepting an invitation that was given after the country indicated it plans to end its six-month blockade of supplies meant for coalition troops in Afghanistan.

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

A NATO soldier stands guard at the scene of a attack by Taliban militants in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Taliban launched a series of coordinated attacks on at least seven sites across the Afghan capital, targeting NATO headquarters, the parliament and diplomatic residences. Militants also launched near-simultaneous assaults in three other eastern cities.

AP Photo/Ahmad Jamshid

NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, center, visits the commando training center in Kabul, Afghanistan. Rasmussen, said Afghan troops would be ready to take the lead role around the country by mid-2013, allowing international combat forces to move into a support and training role.

AP Photo/ Musadeq Sadeq

Visiting U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Thomas Nides, second left, shakes hand with Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, third right, prior to their meeting in Islamabad, Pakistan. U.S. diplomatic efforts to persuade Pakistan to reopen NATO supply lines to the Afghan war are proving no match for rampant anti-Americanism here, with Pakistani lawmakers increasingly unwilling to support a decision that risks them branded as friends of Washington.

AP Photo/ Anjum Naveed

Police chase down activists attempting to scale a fence around NATO headquarters in Brussels. More than 200 demonstrators were detained by police after attempting to jump security fences surrounding NATO headquarters.

AP/PTI

Supporters of a Pakistani religious party Jamat-e-Islami rally to condemn the disposal of Qurans at a U.S. military base in Afghanistan, in Karachi, Pakistan. Banner reads " Protest rally against blasphemy of Quran by U. S. and NATO forces."

AP Photo/ Fareed Khan

Supporters of different religious and right-wing political parties who formed Defense of Pakistan Council, chant anti-American slogans during a rally against the resumption of NATO supplies to neighboring Afghanistan, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan announced that it has been temporarily allowed NATO to ship perishable food to its troops, Pakistan Defense Minister said.

AP/PTI

A U.S. soldier with the NATO led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) walks past by a damaged vehicle at the scene of a suicide attack in Kandahar south of Kabul, Afghanistan. A suicide attacker blew himself up at an entrance to a sprawling base for U.S. and NATO operations in southern Afghanistan, killing 7 civilians, police said.

AP Photo/Allauddin Khan